See also: Cutter

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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A gaff cutter with a staysail and genoa jib set

EtymologyEdit

cut +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cutter (plural cutters)

  1. A person or device that cuts (in various senses).
    a stone cutter; a die cutter
    In some CNC programs, the diameter of the cutter (such as an end mill) is handled by cutter compensation codes.
    • 1982, The Movies (page 288)
      The intervening years, however, were spent as a cutter. He was, indeed, one of the best film editors in the business, winning an Academy Award for Body and Soul (1947).
    • 1988, Jorge Amado, Home is the Sailor (page 55)
      Chico Pacheco kept repeating the phrase between clenched teeth, lamenting the wasted days of his youth; he had been a notorious cutter of classes.
  2. (nautical) A single-masted, fore-and-aft rigged, sailing vessel with at least two headsails, and a mast set further aft than that of a sloop.
  3. A foretooth; an incisor.
    • 1691, John Ray, The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation. [], London: [] Samuel Smith, [], OCLC 1179804186:
      the Cutters and Eye-teeth have usually but one Root
  4. A heavy-duty motor boat for official use.
    a coastguard cutter.
  5. (nautical) A ship's boat, used for transport ship-to-ship or ship-to-shore.
  6. (cricket) A ball that moves sideways in the air, or off the pitch, because it has been cut.
  7. (baseball) A cut fastball.
  8. (slang) A ten-pence piece. So named because it is the coin most often sharpened by prison inmates to use as a weapon.
  9. (slang) A person who practices self-injury.
  10. (medicine, colloquial, slang, humorous or derogatory) A surgeon.
    Synonym: slasher
  11. An animal yielding inferior meat, with little or no external fat and marbling.
    Coordinate terms: canner, darkcutter
    • 1905, United States. Bureau of Corporations, Report of the Commissioner of Corporations on the Beef Industry (page 89)
      Bulls and cows used for breeding, when finally sent to market, are inferior for dressed-beef production. Bulls are demanded especially for sausage and similar products. Cows are largely used as cutters and canners []
  12. (obsolete) An officer in the exchequer who notes by cutting on the tallies the sums paid.
  13. (obsolete) A ruffian; a bravo; a destroyer.
    • Martin Parker, A True Tale of Robin Hood
      So being outlaw'd (as 'tis told), / He with a crew went forth / Of lusty cutters, bold and strong, / And robbed in the north.
    • 1633, A Match at Midnight (disputed authorship)
      He's out of cash, and thou know'st by cutter's law, / We are bound to relieve one another.
  14. (obsolete) A kind of soft yellow brick, easily cut, and used for facework.
  15. A light sleigh drawn by one horse.
    • 2007, Carrie A. Meyer, Days on the Family Farm, U of Minnesota Press, page 55 [1]:
      Throughout much of the winter, the sled or the cutter was the vehicle of choice. Emily and Joseph had a cutter, for traveling in style in snow.
  16. (MLE) A knife.
    Synonyms: splash, splasher, jooka ~ jooker, nank, shank, bassy, rambo, pokey, chete, ying
    • 2021 August 16, (Mali Strip) Killa Kurse x AR x Rondo (lyrics and music), “Buck aii LGR diss”‎[2], 1:23–1:28:
      Hop out the ride with things and stuff
      Back the longest cutter, watch him cut him, [grate their neek trips?] up
 
cutter

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cutter m (plural cutters)

  1. utility knife, box cutter, Stanley knife (tool used to cut)
    Synonyms: couteau à lame rétractable, (Canada) exacto
  2. (nautical) cutter (vessel)

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

NounEdit

cutter m

  1. utility knife, box cutter, Stanley knife (tool used to cut)
    Synonyms: taglierino, trincetto
  2. (nautical) cutter (vessel)