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See also: seka-, sekä, and sęka

Contents

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French sec, Spanish seco, Portuguese seco, Italian secco, from Latin siccus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-. Further similar Indo-European cognates include Welsh sych, Russian сухой (suxój), Lithuanian sausas and Hindi सूखा (sūkhā).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈseka/

AdjectiveEdit

seka (accusative singular sekan, plural sekaj, accusative plural sekajn)

  1. dry

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • sekeco (dryness)
  • sekega (very dry)
  • seketa (slightly dry)
  • sekigi (to dry, transitive verb)
  • sekiĝi (to dry off, intransitive verb)

KaraoEdit

NounEdit

seka

  1. fuzzy-haired caterpillar (with either red or black hairs)

Old FrisianEdit

VerbEdit

seka

  1. to seek

InflectionEdit


PhuthiEdit

VerbEdit

-séka

  1. to cut

InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From sèstra.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sěːka/
  • Hyphenation: se‧ka

NounEdit

séka f (Cyrillic spelling се́ка)

  1. (informal) sis (an affectionate term for a sister or female cousin)

ReferencesEdit

  • seka” in Hrvatski jezični portal

WestrobothnianEdit

VerbEdit

seka

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To cut with blunt knife or other tool; cut gradually.
  2. To work slowly, be slow, sluggish in movement; postpone, delay; is said in general about everything that goes sluggishly.
    Han gekk å seka fot óm fot.
    He walked slowly, foot by foot.
    Hon seka å spann
    She spun slowly.
    Han seka å tåggä.
    He chewed slowly.
  3. To nag, early and often remind.

Related termsEdit


XhosaEdit

VerbEdit

-seka?

  1. (transitive) to establish

InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.