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AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin siccāre, present active infinitive of siccō.

VerbEdit

secar (first-person singular indicative present seco, past participle secáu)

  1. to dry

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese, from Latin siccāre, present active infinitive of siccō.

VerbEdit

secar (first-person singular present seco, first-person singular preterite sequé, past participle secado)

  1. to dry
  2. first-person and third-person singular future subjunctive of secar
  3. first-person and third-person singular personal infinitive of secar

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin siccāre, present active infinitive of siccō.

VerbEdit

secar

  1. to dry; to dry out

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese, from Latin siccāre, present active infinitive of siccō, from siccus (dry), from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

secar (first-person singular present indicative seco, past participle secado)

  1. (intransitive) to dry (to become dry)
  2. (transitive) to dry (to make dry)
  3. to dry up (to deprive someone of something vital)
  4. (intransitive) to wither (to shrivel, droop or dry up)

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin siccāre, present active infinitive of siccō.

VerbEdit

secar (first-person singular present seco, first-person singular preterite sequé, past participle secado)

  1. to dry

ConjugationEdit

  • c becomes qu before e.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit