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See also: garbó and garbò

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From garbage +‎ -o (colloquialising suffix).

NounEdit

garbo (plural garbos)

  1. (Australia, informal) A rubbish collector.
    • 1986, Emily George, Merri Lee: A Feminist Fantasy, page 124,
      Then believe it or not, I worked for some time as a garbo, collecting the rubbish in the wee hours of the morning.
    • 1998, Hall Greenland, Red Hot: The Life & Times of Nick Origlass, 1908-1996, page 253,
      The referendum papers, accompanied by a strong statement of Council′s position, was to be letterboxed by the Council′s “garbos” (rubbish collectors) and inspectors on a Thursday and collected by volunteers over the weekend.
    • 2010, Zana Fraillon, Monstrum House: Locked In, unnumbered page,
      As far as Jasper was concerned, his mum being a garbo was pretty cool. She got to drive a truck and be home in time to take his little sisters to school. Before she got the job as a rubbish collector, his mum had done shift work and it was left to Jasper to get his sisters to school.
    • 2010, Adam Shand, The Skull: Informers, Hit Men and Australia′s Toughest Cop, page 350,
      The priest would bring salvation while the garbo took the rubbish.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Garbe or Yiddish גאַרב (garb).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

garbo (accusative singular garbon, plural garboj, accusative plural garbojn)

  1. sheaf

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German garwi (dress; equipment; preparation), from Proto-Germanic *garwijaną (to prepare).[1] More at garb.

Alternatively, perhaps borrowed from Arabic قَالِب (qālib, model, outline), from Persian کالب (form, mold), from Ancient Greek καλόπους (kalópous, shoemaker's block), from κᾶλον (kâlon, firewood, joiner's wood) +‎ πούς (poús, foot) in which case cognate with English galoshe.

NounEdit

garbo m (plural garbi)

  1. politeness, gentleness, tact, grace
    Synonyms: educazione, gentilezza, tatto, grazia
  2. graceful form
  3. (nautical) curvature of the hull
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

garbo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of garbare

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN, page 753

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

garbo m (plural garbos)

  1. grace, style, chic, elegance
  2. daintiness
  3. polish

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian garbo.

NounEdit

garbo m (plural garbos)

  1. grace
  2. style

Related termsEdit