sequela

See also: seqüela

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sequēla (that which follows),[1] from sequi (follow). Compare sequence.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sequela (plural sequelae)

  1. (pathology) A disease or condition which is caused by an earlier disease or problem.
    • 1970, JG Ballard, The Atrocity Exhibition:
      Complications: haematoma formation is a dangerous sequela of this operation, and careful drainage with polythene tubing was carried out.
    • 1973 Patrick O'Brian, HMS Surprise,
      ‘Ay, ay,’ said Stephen testily, ‘it is showy enough to look at, no doubt, but these are only the superficial sequelae. There is no essential lesion.’
    • 2003, Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason, Penguin 2004, p. 407,
      Self-dosing brought emotional and physical sequelae of its own.
  2. That which follows; an inference or corollary.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ sequela” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sequela f (plural sequele)

  1. string, sequence, series, string
  2. (pathology) sequela

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sequela f (plural sequelas)

  1. (pathology) sequela (condition caused by an earlier disease or problem)
  2. consequence; effect
  3. sequence; series; string
    1. sequel (a following release in a series of films, books etc.)[1]
  4. entourage (retinue of attendants, associates or followers)

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit