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EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

  • shawe (13th-17th centuries)

EtymologyEdit

Old English sceaga, scaga. Cognate with Old Norse skógr (forest, wood), whence Danish skov (forest).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shaw (plural shaws)

  1. (dated) A thicket; a small wood or grove.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xxxix, in Le Morte Darthur, book IX:
      Thenne said sire kay I requyre you lete vs preue this aduenture / I shal not fayle you said sir Gaherys / and soo they rode that tyme tyl a lake / that was that tyme called the peryllous lake / And there they abode vnder the shawe of the wood
    • 1936, Alfred Edward Housman, More Poems, V, lines 1-2
      The snows are fled away, leaves on the shaws, / And grasses in the mead renew their birth,
  2. (Scotland) The leaves and tops of vegetables, especially potatoes and turnips.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon, 2006 (A Scots Quair), p.35:
      Up here the hills were brave with the beauty and the heat of it, but the hayfield was still all a crackling dryness and in the potato park beyond the biggings the shaws drooped red and rusty already.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English schewen, schawen, scheawen, from Old English scēawian, from Proto-Germanic *skawwōną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewh₁-.

NounEdit

shaw (plural shaws)

  1. A show.

VerbEdit

shaw (third-person singular present shaws, present participle shawin, past shawt, past participle shawt)

  1. To show.