See also: Leaf

EnglishEdit

 
A leaf
 
leaves (plural form)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English leef, from Old English lēaf, from Proto-West Germanic *laub, from Proto-Germanic *laubą (leaf) (compare West Frisian leaf, Low German Loov, Dutch loof, German Laub, Danish løv, Swedish löv, Norwegian Nynorsk lauv), from Proto-Indo-European *lowbʰ-o-m, from *lewbʰ- (leaf, rind)[1] (compare Irish luibh (herb), Latin liber (bast; book), Lithuanian lúoba (bark), Albanian labë (rind), Latvian luba (plank, board), Russian луб (lub, bast)).

(Internet slang: Canadian): In reference to the maple leaf as national symbol.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leaf (countable and uncountable, plural leaves)

  1. The usually green and flat organ that represents the most prominent feature of most vegetative plants.
    • 2013 May-June, William E. Conner, “An Acoustic Arms Race”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 206-7:
      Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.
  2. Anything resembling the leaf of a plant.
  3. A sheet of a book, magazine, etc (consisting of two pages, one on each face of the leaf).
  4. A sheet of any substance beaten or rolled until very thin.
    gold leaf
    Synonyms: folio, folium
  5. (advertising, dated) Two pages.
    • 1900, Profitable Advertising (volume 10, issue 2, page 893)
      Heretofore advertisers have had to buy and pay for a leaf — two pages.
  6. (in the plural) Tea leaves.
  7. A flat section used to extend the size of a table.
  8. (plural leaves or leafs) A moveable panel, e.g. of a bridge or door, originally one that hinged but now also applied to other forms of movement.
    The train car has one single-leaf and two double-leaf doors per side.
    Hyponym: doorleaf
    Meronym: stile
    • 1914, Department of Bridges, City of New York, Report, page 90:
      The bridge shear locks were repaired and the long ends of the shear locks shortened about two inches to eliminate butting of the bridge leafs against each other.
    • 1992 July 21, William R. Kennedy; John M. Kennedy, Power mine door system[1], US Patent 5,222,838:
      It will be noted that the pivotal mounting of the cylinders is such that the cylinders have their greatest leverage (i.e., exert the greatest door-opening force) when the door leafs 24, 28 are closed because the cylinders are generally perpendicular to the closed leafs. This is desirable because the load on the leafs is the greatest when they are closed due to air pressure. As the leafs begin to open and this air pressure decreases, the opening force exerted by the cylinders on the door leafs decreases and the opening speed of the leafs increases.
    • 1993, Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1994: Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, →ISBN, page 136:
      THE NTSB RECOMMENDS THAT THE U.S. COAST GUARD: REQUIRE OWNERS/OPERATORS OF BASCULE BRIDGES TO INSTALL CAUTION LIGHTS AND DAYLIGHT MARKINGS AT ELEVATION POINTS ON BRIDGE LEAFS WHERE THEY PROTRUDE OVER NAVIGABLE CHANNELS TO IDEN TIFY[sic] TO MARINERS THE POINT AT WHICH FULL SKYWARD CHANNEL CLEARANCE IS NOT AVAILABLE TO TRANSITING VESSELS: THE LIGHTS SHOULD ACTIVATE WHEN THE BRIDGELEAFS ARE IN THE NORMAL FULLY OPEN POSITION. [] THE NTSB RECOMMENDS THAT THE U.S. COAST GUARD: REQUIRE THAT BRIDGE OWNERS/OPERATORS PROVIDE IN BASCULE BRIDGE PERMIT APPLICATIONS THE ANGLE OF THE BRIDGELEAF(S). THE MAXIMUM VERTICAL CLEARANCE AT THE FENDERS AND AT THE BRIDGELEAF ENDS, AND THE EXTENT OF HORIZONTAL CHANNEL CLEARANCE OVER WHICH FULL SKYWARD CLEARANCE IS AVAILABLE WHEN THE BRIDGE LEAFS ARE IN THE FULLY OPEN POSITION.
    • 1993, Realty and Building, page 20:
      The four separate segments of the movable bridge span, known as bridge leafs, were alternately rehabilitated while maintaining upper-level roadway and pedestrian traffic on one-half of the bridge and waterway traffic on one-half of the river channel.
    • 1993, The Americana Annual: An Encyclopedia of Current Events, Grolier, →ISBN, ISSN 0196-0180, LCCN 23-10041, page 224:
      The hydraulic system lifts and rotates two 413-ft (126-m) bridge leafs, each weighing 7,500 tons, in just four minutes.
    • 1996, Gerard R. Wolfe, Chicago in and Around the Loop: Walking Tours of Architecture and History, McGraw-Hill, →ISBN, page 150:
      Note the Art Deco-style sculptures on the wall of the bridge house showing a ship passing under the raised bridge leafs.
    • 2010, James Newport-Chiakulas, Bridges to Justice: Love, Murder, & Politics in Chicago, iUniverse, →ISBN, page 55:
      Like I’ve said, John, you’ve got to get the two bridge leafs to come down very slowly to a complete stop in order to trigger the tongue locks. This is what holds the two leafs of the bridge firmly in place. Otherwise, the bridge leafs will start bouncing, and once they start bouncing, you’ll never stop them from goin’ straight up in the air.
  9. (botany) A foliage leaf or any of the many and often considerably different structures it can specialise into.
  10. (computing, mathematics) In a tree, a node that has no descendants.
    • 2011, John Mongan, Noah Kindler, Eric Giguère, Programming Interviews Exposed
      The algorithm pops the stack to obtain a new current node when there are no more children (when it reaches a leaf).
  11. The layer of fat supporting the kidneys of a pig, leaf fat.
  12. One of the teeth of a pinion, especially when small.
  13. (slang, uncountable) Cannabis.
  14. (Internet slang, humorous, sometimes pejorative) A Canadian person.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Tok Pisin: lip

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

leaf (third-person singular simple present leafs, present participle leafing, simple past and past participle leafed)

  1. (intransitive) To produce leaves; put forth foliage.
  2. (transitive) To divide (a vegetable) into separate leaves.
    The lettuce in our burgers is 100% hand-leafed.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 337

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *laubą. Cognate with Old Saxon lōf, Old High German loub, Old Norse lauf, Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐍆𐍃 (laufs).

NounEdit

lēaf n

  1. leaf
  2. page
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *laubō. Cognate with Old High German *louba (German Laube).

NounEdit

lēaf f

  1. permission
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English lēaf.

NounEdit

leaf (plural leafs)

  1. leaf

West FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Frisian lāf

NounEdit

leaf n (plural leaven, diminutive leafke)

  1. leaf, especially a long leaf, like a blade of grass
Further readingEdit
  • leaf (IV)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Frisian liāf

AdjectiveEdit

leaf

  1. friendly, kind, cordial
InflectionEdit
Inflection of leaf
uninflected leaf
inflected leave
comparative leaver
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial leaf leaver it leafst
it leafste
indefinite c. sing. leave leavere leafste
n. sing. leaf leaver leafste
plural leave leavere leafste
definite leave leavere leafste
partitive leafs leavers
Derived termsEdit
Further readingEdit
  • leaf (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011