See also: Argent

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English argent, from Old French argent (silver), from Latin argentum (white money, silver).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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argent (countable and uncountable, plural argents)

  1. (archaic) The metal silver.
  2. (heraldry) The white or silver tincture on a coat of arms.
    argent:  
    • 1909, Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, A Complete Guide to Heraldry:
      The metals are gold and silver, these being termed "or" and "argent".
  3. (obsolete, poetic) Whiteness; anything that is white.
  4. A moth of the genus Argyresthia.

Translations

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Adjective

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argent (not comparable)

  1. Of silver or silver-coloured.
  2. (heraldry): of white or silver tincture on a coat of arms.
    • 1889, Charles Norton Elvin, A Dictionary of Heraldry:
      ... when the shield is argent, it is shown in an engraving by being left plain.

Synonyms

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Translations

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Derived terms

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  • Ag (chemical symbol for silver)

See also

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Quotations

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The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}}.
  • 1667, John Milton, “(please specify the page number)”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
    Those argent Fields more likely habitants, / Translated Saints, or middle Spirits hold / Betwixt th' Angelical and Human kinde
  • 1818, John Keats, “(please specify the page)”, in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, London: [] [T. Miller] for Taylor and Hessey, [], →OCLC:
    she did soar / So passionately bright, my dazzled soul / Commingling with her argent spheres did roll / Through clear and cloudy
  • 1818, John Keats, “(please specify the page)”, in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, London: [] [T. Miller] for Taylor and Hessey, [], →OCLC:
    Pardon me, airy planet, that I prize / One thought beyond thine argent luxuries!
  • 1818, Two wings this orb / Possess'd for glory, two fair argent wings — John Keats, Hyperion
  • 1819, At length burst in the argent revelry, / With plume, tiara, and all rich array, / Numerous as shadows haunting fairily / The brain — John Keats, The Eve of St Agnes
  • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: James R[ipley] Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., [], →OCLC:
    "A castle argent is certainly my crest," said he blandly.
  • 1922 February, James Joyce, Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare and Company, [], →OCLC:
    Like John o'Gaunt his name is dear to him, as dear as the coat and crest he toadied for, on a bend sable a spear or steeled argent, honorificabilitudinitatibus, dearer than his glory of greatest shakescene in the country.
  • 1922 February, James Joyce, Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare and Company, [], →OCLC:
    Keep our flag flying! An eagle gules volant in a field argent displayed.
  • 1967, Argent I craft you as the star / Of flower-shut evening — John Berryman, Berryman's Sonnets

Anagrams

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Catalan

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Chemical element
Ag
Previous: pal·ladi (Pd)
Next: cadmi (Cd)

Etymology

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Inherited from Latin argentum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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argent m (uncountable)

  1. silver
    Synonym: plata
  2. (heraldry) argent
  3. (figurative) money, cash
    Synonyms: calé, diner

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Franco-Provençal

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin argentum.

Noun

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argent m (ORB large)

  1. silver
  2. money
  3. fortune, riches

References

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  • argent in DicoFranPro: Dictionnaire Français/Francoprovençal – on dicofranpro.llm.umontreal.ca
  • argent in Lo trèsor Arpitan – on arpitan.eu

French

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French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology

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Inherited from Middle French argent, from Old French argent, from Latin argentum (according to the TLFi etymological dictionary, a borrowing), itself from Proto-Italic *argentom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥ǵn̥tóm, from *h₂erǵ- (white).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /aʁ.ʒɑ̃/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: ar‧gent

Noun

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argent m (plural argents)

  1. silver
  2. money, cash
    Synonyms: oseille, fric, thune, pognon, liquide, blé, peso, rond, pèze, sous, flouze, bifton, biff, mitraille
  3. (heraldry) argent (white in heraldry)

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Haitian Creole: ajan
  • Louisiana Creole: larjên

References

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Middle French

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Etymology

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From Old French argent.

Noun

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argent m (plural argens or argentz)

  1. silver (metal)
  2. silver (color)

Descendants

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Norman

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old French argent, from Latin argentum (possibly a borrowing), itself from Proto-Italic *argentom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥ǵn̥tóm, from *h₂erǵ- (white).

Noun

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argent m (uncountable)

  1. silver
  2. (Jersey) snow-in-summer

Derived terms

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Occitan

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Etymology

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From Old Occitan argent, from Latin argentum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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argent m (plural argents)

  1. silver

Old French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Latin argentum.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): (early) /aɾˈd͡ʒent/
  • IPA(key): (late) /aɾˈʒant/

Noun

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argent oblique singularm (oblique plural argenz or argentz, nominative singular argenz or argentz, nominative plural argent)

  1. silver (metal)
  2. silver (color)

Descendants

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References

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Old Occitan

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Latin argentum.

Noun

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argent m (oblique plural argents, nominative singular argents, nominative plural argent)

  1. silver

Descendants

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References

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Old Spanish

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Etymology

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From Old Occitan argent, from Latin argentum, from Proto-Italic *argentom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥ǵn̥tóm.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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argent m (usually uncountable)

  1. silver
    Synonym: plata f
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 55v:
      cuemos torno putána la cibdad fidel plena de iudicios : iuſticia manie enella e agora homicidio. To argent es tónado eſcoria to uino es buelto en agua.
      How the faithful city full of righteousness has become a harlot! Justice dwelt within her, but now murder. Your silver has become dross and your wine has turned into water.