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DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A borrowing from Middle Low German sin (sense, perception, mind), from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sind n (singular definite sindet, plural indefinite sind)

  1. mind
  2. temper, disposition

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


EstonianEdit

PronounEdit

sind

  1. partitive singular of sina

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /zɪnt/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /zɪn/ (colloquial; chiefly central and southern Germany)
  • (file)

VerbEdit

sind

  1. First-person plural present of sein.
    Wir sind hier. - We are here.
  2. Third-person plural present of sein.
    (polite) Wo sind Sie? - Where are you?
    Da sind sie. - There they are.

Usage notesEdit

Colloquially, the verb may contract with the following pronoun wir (we) into the form simmer.


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

sind

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌹𐌽𐌳

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sind, plural present indicative of wesan (to be), from Proto-Germanic *sindi, third-person plural present indicative of *wesaną (to be, become), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti.

VerbEdit

sind

  1. (Early Middle English) Plural present indicative form of been
Usage notesEdit

The usual plural form of been is aren in the North, been in the Midlands, and beth in the South; sind also existed, especially early on, but was not the predominant form in any area.


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sindi, third-person plural present indicative of *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁sénti, third-person plural present indicative of *h₁ésti.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sind

  1. all persons plural present indicative of wesan

Old High GermanEdit

NounEdit

sind ?

  1. way
  2. travel

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sinden (to wash, rinse out), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Old Norse synda (to swim).

VerbEdit

sind

  1. (transitive) To rinse; swill; wash.