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See also: Been

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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ybeen, been, past participle of been (to be), from Old English ġebēon, past participle of bēon (to be), equivalent to be +‎ -en.

Alternative formsEdit

  • (obsolete): ybe (see y-).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

been

  1. past participle of be

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English been, be, present plural of been (to be) (with the -n leveled in from the past and subjunctive; compare competing forms aren/are, beth), from Old English bēoþ, present plural of bēon (to be), from Proto-Germanic *biunþi, third-person present plural of *beuną (to be, become).

VerbEdit

been

  1. (obsolete) plural simple present of be
    • 1584, George Peele, The Arraignment of Paris, I, ii
      My love is fair, my love is gay,
      As fresh as been the flowers in May;
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, II
      Where when men been, there's seldom ease;
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, The Sad Shepherd, I, iii
      O Friar, those are faults that are not seen,
      Ours open, and of worse example been.
    • 1686, Edward Fairfax, transl., Godfrey of Bulloigne: Or, The Recovery of Jerusalem[1], 20, page 8:
      Some of green Boughs their slender Cabbins frame, / Some lodged were Tortoſa's streets about, / Of all the Hoſt the Chief of Worth and Name / Aſſembled been, a Senate grave and ſtout;

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English been (to be), from Old English bēon (to be), from Proto-Germanic *beuną (to be, become).

VerbEdit

been

  1. (Southern US) infinitive of be

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English been, from Old English bēon (bees), nominative and accusative plural of bēo (bee), equivalent to bee +‎ -en.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

been

  1. (Britain dialectal) plural of bee

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Vaux, Bert and Scott Golder. 2003. The Harvard Dialect Survey: been. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Linguistics Department.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

 
Afrikaans Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia af

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch been.

NounEdit

been (plural bene or beendere, diminutive beentjie)

  1. leg
  2. bone

Usage notesEdit

  • The plural beendere is used alternatively in the sense “bone”, especially collectively.

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch bêen, from Old Dutch bēn, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

been n (plural benen, diminutive beentje n)

  1. leg, limb of a person, horse (other animals' would have poten) and certain objects (again many have poten)
    De benen van een passer.The legs of a pair of compasses.
  2. (mathematics) side, leg
    De benen van een hoek.The sides of an angle.

Usage notesEdit

  • The contemporary plural benen is derived from an analogy to other nouns with regular plurals. Originally, been was left unchanged in the plural; such use in preserved only in set phrases like op de been (upright, standing, awake).

NounEdit

been n (plural beenderen or benen, diminutive beentje n)

  1. bone, constituent part of a skeleton.
  2. (uncountable) bone, the chalky material bones are made of

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

been

  1. first-person singular present indicative of benen
  2. imperative of benen

AnagramsEdit


Dutch Low SaxonEdit

NounEdit

been

  1. leg

See alsoEdit

  • German Low German: Been

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

been

  1. Genitive singular form of bee.
  2. Accusative singular form of bee.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch bēn, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

NounEdit

bêen n

  1. leg
  2. foot
  3. bone

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • been”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • been”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a conflation of Old English bēon and wesan, from Proto-Germanic *beuną and *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewHeti and a conflation of *h₂wéseti and *h₁ésti.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

been

  1. to be
    • 1382 John Wycliffe, translation of the Bible (John 1:48)
      Bifor that Filip clepide thee, whanne thou were vndur the fige tree, Y saiy thee.
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      ...Filip of Repintoun whilis he was a chanoun of Leycetre, Nycol Herforde, dane Geffrey of Pikeringe, monke of Biland and a maistir dyuynyte, and Ioon Purueye, and manye other whiche weren holden rightwise men and prudent...
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English bēon, nominative plural form of bēo, from Proto-Germanic *bijōniz, nominative plural form of *bijǭ.

NounEdit

been

  1. plural of bee

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ybeen, from Old English ġebēon, past participle of bēon (to be).

VerbEdit

been

  1. past participle of be