EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

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In all senses, a mostly British spelling of slue.

NounEdit

slew (plural slews)

  1. The act, or process of slewing.
  2. A device used for slewing.
  3. A change of position.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

slew (third-person singular simple present slews, present participle slewing, simple past and past participle slewed)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To rotate or turn something about its axis.
  2. (transitive) To veer a vehicle.
    • 2020 July 15, Drachinifel, The Battle of Jutland - Clash of the Titans - Part 1 (Beatty vs Hipper)[1], archived from the original on 15 October 2022, retrieved 17 October 2022, 1:04:58 from the start:
      As the 5th Battle Squadron comes into the range of the High Seas Fleet, Admiral Evan-Thomas, who, so far, has dutifully followed Beatty's orders (or lack of them), has finally had just about enough. He can see the danger, plain as day, as the High Seas Fleet's leading elements open up a barrage with every gun they possess. He therefore issues his own squadron orders to expect to have to make sudden course changes and to follow his lead, before ordering the wheel hard over and slewing Barham around. Valiant and Warspite move to follow, replicating the "turn in succession" order, whilst the trailing HMS Malaya sees the oncoming danger and prepares to turn as soon as it possibly can without crashing into Warspite.
  3. (transitive) To insert extra ticks or skip some ticks of a clock to slowly correct its time.
  4. (intransitive) To pivot.
  5. (intransitive) To skid.
  6. (transitive, rail transport) To move something (usually a railway line) sideways.
    The single line was slewed onto the disused up formation to make way for the future redoubling.
    • 2022 November 16, Howard Johnston, “Regional News: Wales”, in RAIL, number 970, page 27:
      Treforest: The track has been slewed to create space for the new island station platform at Treforest Estate, on the Cardiff-Merthyr line.
  7. (transitive, Britain, slang) To make a public mockery of someone through insult or wit.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare slough.

NounEdit

slew (plural slews)

  1. A wet place; a river inlet.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      The prairie round about is wet, at times almost marshy, especially at the borders of the great reedy slews.

Etymology 3Edit

Ablaut of slay, from Middle English slew, sleugh, past of Middle English sleen. Replaced earlier Middle English slough, slogh, from Old English slōg (past of Old English slēan (to hit, strike, slay)), due to the influence of knew, drew, etc. More at slay.

VerbEdit

slew

  1. simple past tense of slay

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from Irish slua (crowd), from Old Irish slúag, slóg, from Proto-Celtic *slougos (troop, army), from Proto-Indo-European *slowgʰos, *slowgos (entourage).

NounEdit

slew (plural slews)

  1. (US) A large amount.
    She has a slew of papers and notebooks strewn all over her desk.
    • 2021 February 24, Philip Haigh, “A shift from cars: Scotland's railways are friends of electric!”, in RAIL, number 915, page 30:
      There has been a slew of documents about Scottish transport planning in recent weeks.
TranslationsEdit
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AnagramsEdit