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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle Dutch vieren (to slacken).

VerbEdit

veer (third-person singular simple present veers, present participle veering, simple past and past participle veered)

  1. (obsolete, nautical) To let out (a sail-line), to allow (a sheet) to run out.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, volume 12:
      As when a skilfull Marriner doth reed / A storme approching, that doth perill threat, / He will not bide the daunger of such dread, / But strikes his sayles, and vereth his mainsheat, / And lends vnto it leaue the emptie ayre to beat.

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Middle French virer.

NounEdit

veer (plural veers)

  1. A turn or swerve; an instance of veering.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

veer (third-person singular simple present veers, present participle veering, simple past and past participle veered)

  1. (intransitive) To change direction or course suddenly; to swerve.
    The car slid on the ice and veered out of control.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Dryden:
      And as he leads, the following navy veers.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Burke:
      An ordinary community which is hostile or friendly as passion or as interest may veer about.
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[1]:
      At this time in 2008, even as the global economy veered toward collapse, optimism about Washington ran surprisingly high.
  2. (intransitive, of the wind) To shift in a clockwise direction (if in the Northern Hemisphere, or in a counterclockwise direction if in the Southern Hemisphere).[1]
  3. (intransitive, nautical, of the wind) To shift aft.[1]
  4. (intransitive, nautical) To change direction into the wind; to wear ship.
  5. (transitive) To turn.
AntonymsEdit
  • (of the wind, to shift clockwise): back
  • (of the wind, to shift aft): haul forward
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bowditch 2002

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch veer.

NounEdit

veer (plural vere)

  1. feather

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vita.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

veer

  1. (dialectal, Fjolde) to know

ReferencesEdit

  • veer” in Anders Bjerrum and Marie Bjerrum (1974), Ordbog over Fjoldemålet, Copenhagen: Akademisk Forlag.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A contraction of veder, from Middle Dutch vedere, from Old Dutch fethara, from Proto-Germanic *feþrō, from Proto-Indo-European *péth₂r̥ ~ pth₂én- (feather, wing), from *peth₂- (to fly). The sense "spring" is derived from the ability of feathers to resume their shape when bent.

Cognate with Low German Fedder, German Feder, West Frisian fear, English feather, Danish fjer, Swedish fjäder.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

veer c (plural veren, diminutive veertje n)

  1. feather
  2. spring (e.g. metallic helix which resists stress)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

veer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of veren
  2. imperative of veren

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch vere, from Old Dutch feri, from Proto-Germanic *farją.

Cognate with German Fähre.

NounEdit

veer n (plural veren, diminutive veertje n)

  1. ferry
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Dutch Low SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately cognate to German vier.

NumeralEdit

veer

  1. four (4)

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *veeri.

NounEdit

veer (genitive veere, partitive veert)

  1. edge

DeclensionEdit


German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately cognate to German vier, English four.

NumeralEdit

veer

  1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) four (4)

See alsoEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

veer

  1. Alternative form of veoir

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vidēre, present active infinitive of videō, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to know; see).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

veer

  1. to see

DescendantsEdit

  • Galician: ver
  • Portuguese: ver