EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Middle English squelen, probably from Old Norse skvala (to squeal, bawl), from Proto-Germanic *skwel- (to chatter, babble, scream), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *skel-, from *kelh₁- (to ring, resound, cry). Compare Old Norse skval (a squeal, noun), Swedish skvallra (to babble, chatter, tell on).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /skwiːl/ 
  • (US) IPA(key): /skwil/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːl

NounEdit

squeal (plural squeals)

  1. A high-pitched sound, such as the scream of a child or a female person, or noisy worn-down brake pads.
  2. The cry of a pig.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

squeal (third-person singular simple present squeals, present participle squealing, simple past and past participle squealed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To scream with a shrill, prolonged sound.
    I made my girlfriend squeal with delight last night.
  2. (intransitive, slang) To give sensitive information about someone to a third party; to rat on someone.

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