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EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Representing non-standard pronunciation of one.

NounEdit

un (plural uns)

  1. (dialectal) One.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus. Compare Daco-Romanian un.

ArticleEdit

un (feminine unã)

  1. (indefinite article) a, an

Related termsEdit


AsturianEdit

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primeru

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus.

NumeralEdit

un or unu m (feminine una)

  1. (cardinal) one

BinandereEdit

NounEdit

un

  1. water

Further readingEdit

  • Jonathan Paul Wilson, Binandere nominal structures (1996)

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

ArticleEdit

un

  1. a/an

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal un, from Latin ūnum (one), accusative form of ūnus (one), from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine una, masculine plural uns, feminine plural unes)

  1. an; the indefinite article
  2. (in the plural) some

Usage notesEdit

  • Unlike English, Catalan uses the indefinite article with plural nouns as well as singular nouns.
  • Catalan cardinal numbers may be used as masculine or feminine adjectives, except un/una (1), dos/dues (2), cents/centes (100s) and its compounds. When used as nouns, Catalan cardinal numbers are treated as masculine singular nouns in most contexts, but in expressions involving time such as la una i trenta (1:30) or les dues (two o'clock), they are feminine because the feminine noun hora has been elided.

NumeralEdit

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primer
Catalan Wikipedia article on un

un m (feminine una, noun form u)

  1. (cardinal) one

PronounEdit

un m sg (feminine una)

  1. one; indefinite pronoun

ChamorroEdit

EtymologyEdit

Adjective and article from Spanish un.

AdjectiveEdit

un

  1. one

ArticleEdit

un

  1. a, an

PronounEdit

un

  1. you (used in transitive sentences)
    Kao un taitai i lepblo-mu?Did you read your book?

ChuukeseEdit

VerbEdit

un

  1. to drink

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

ConjunctionEdit

un

  1. and

FalaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese un, from Latin ūnus (one), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one; single).

ArticleEdit

un m (plural un-os, feminine un-a, feminine plural un-as)

  1. a (masculine singular indefinite article)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 2: Númerus?:
      As lenguas, idiomas, dialectus o falas tenin un-as funciós mui claras desde o principiu dos siglu i si hai contabilizaus en o mundu un-as 8.000 lenguas, ca un-a con sua importancia numérica relativa, a nossa fala é un tesoiru mais entre elas.
      The tongues, languages or regional variants have some very clear functions since the beginning of the centuries and some 8,000 languages have been accounted for in the world, each with its relative numerical importance, our Fala is another treasure among them.

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one (numerical value equal to 1)

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French un, from Latin ūnum, accusative singular of ūnus (one), from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /œ̃/
  • (with merger of un with in) IPA(key): /ɛ̃/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine une, plural des, negative de)

  1. an, a

NumeralEdit

French cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : premier
French Wikipedia article on un

un

  1. one

NounEdit

un m (plural un)

  1. one

PronounEdit

un m

  1. one

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus.

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine une)

  1. a, an

AdjectiveEdit

un

  1. one

NumeralEdit

un (feminine une)

  1. (cardinal) one

PronounEdit

un

  1. one

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

Galician cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primeiro
Galician Wikipedia article on un

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese un, ũu, from Latin ūnus.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

un m sg (feminine unha, masculine plural uns, feminine plural unhas)

  1. (indefinite) a, one

Usage notesEdit

The article un and its inflected forms unha,uns, and unhas all form contractions with the prepositions con (with), de (of, from), and en (in).

Derived termsEdit

NumeralEdit

un m (feminine unha)

  1. (cardinal) one

Usage notesEdit

The numeral un and its feminine form unha form contractions with the prepositions con (with), de (of, from), and en (in).

Derived termsEdit


German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • on (in Low Prussian and some other dialects)

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately cognate to German und.

ConjunctionEdit

un

  1. (in several dialects, including Hamburgisch and East Frisian) and
    Planten un Blomenplants and flowers

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

un

  1. (transitive) to be bored of, to be fed up with, to be tired of

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):


IdoEdit

Ido cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : unesma
    Adverbial : unfoye
    Multiplier : unopla
    Fractional : unima
Ido Wikipedia article on un

EtymologyEdit

From French un, Spanish un, Italian un, all from Latin ūnus.

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one (1)

InterlinguaEdit

ArticleEdit

un

  1. an, a

NumeralEdit

un

  1. one

InterlingueEdit

ArticleEdit

un

  1. Indefinite article: a

NumeralEdit

un

  1. one

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From uno, from Latin ūnus (one).

ArticleEdit

un m (see uno)

  1. an, a

NounEdit

un m (see uno)

  1. one

AdjectiveEdit

un m (see uno)

  1. one

PronounEdit

un m (see uno)

  1. one

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

un

  1. Rōmaji transcription of うん

LadinEdit

Ladin cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : prim

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus.

AdjectiveEdit

un

  1. one

NounEdit

un m (uncountable)

  1. one

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle Low German un (and). It replaced, in this sense, the particle ir (compare Lithuanian ir, which still has the sense of “and”). At first there were competing borrowings from other Germanic dialects (e.g. und, unde), and some forms were influenced by ir (resulting in ind, in), but from the 18th century on, the form un gradually became dominant.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

ConjunctionEdit

un

  1. additive conjunction used to link similar terms in a clause; and
    Didzis un Ilga apstājāsDidzis and Ilga stopped
    tas ir skaists un dārgsthis is beautiful and expensive
    tēvs strādā un domāfather is working and thinking
  2. used to link clauses within a sentence; and
    Lupatu Zeta smējās tik sirsnīgi, ka asaras sakāpa acīs un pat Lupats pieliecās klausītiesLupatu Zeta laughed so heartily that tears filled her eyes and even Lupats leaned forward to listen
    pie tēva vīri atnāk uz runāšanu... Annelei patīk skatīties, kādi tie vīri un kā viņi runā(some) men came to father to talk... Annele liked to look what those men looked like and how they spoke
  3. used to link two independent clauses, indicating simultaneity, sequence, contrast, opposition, or comparison between them; and
    uzlec saule, un sākas jauna dienathe sun rises, and a new day begins
    Annele papurināja smiedamās galvu, un visi lakati bija atkal nostAnnele shook her head, laughing, and all scarves were (= fell) off once more
    Ansis bija noliesējis gluži dzeltenīgs, nomocījis, un tomēr viņa acīs bija arī līksmībaAnsis had lost weight, grown rather yellow, (he looked) run down, and yet in his eyes there was also joy
    pavasarī viņam palika pieci gadi, un tas jau bija diezgan cienījams vecumsin spring he became five years (old), and that was already quite a respectable age
  4. used to introduce an independent clause, linking it to the preceding context
    mātei varēja stāstīt visu... vai tiešām visu? un Ģirts atskārta, ka pēdējā laikā noticis daudz kas tāds, par ko viņš tomēr nestāstīs mātei...mother might tell everything... really everything? and Ģirts realized that recently many things had happened that he wouldn't tell mother...
    atceries, cik Latvijā šis vārds skanēja noslēpumaini un vilinoši: Kalifornija! un tagad ļoti labvēlīgs liktenis tevi iespēlējis tieši teiksmainajā Kalifornijāremember how in Latvia this word sounds mysterious and tempting: California! and now a very favorable fate has brought you to legendary California

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “un”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

LigurianEdit

Ligurian cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : prìmmo
    Adverbial : ùnn-a vòtta
    Multiplier : séncio
    Distributive : scingolarménte

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus, from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

un m (feminine ùnn-a)

  1. (cardinal) one

NounEdit

un m (invariable)

  1. The number one.

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine ùnn-a)

  1. a, an (male)

Usage notesEdit

  • When followed by a word beginning with a vowel, the article undergoes apheresis, becoming 'n, and the place of articulation of the nasal changes from velar to dental:
    un + òmmo → 'n òmmo (“a man”) (pronounced [ˈnɔmmu], NOT [ˈŋɔmmu])
  • When followed by a word beginning with a consonant:
    • the article becomes in (pron. /iŋ/), if:
      • it is found in sentence-initial position, or after a punctuation mark
      • it is preceded by a word ending in /ŋ/
        in matìn in figeu o corîva – a boy was running one morning (pron. [iŋ maˈtiŋ iŋ fiˈd͡ʒø u kuˈriːva])
    • the article undergoes apheresis, becoming 'n, without the nasal changing place of articulation:
      ò visto 'n zìn – I saw a sea urchin (pron. [ɔ ˈvistu ŋ ˈziŋ])

PronounEdit

un m (feminine ùnn-a)

  1. someone, a person
    Ò vìsto un ch'o m'à dæto dêxe éori.
    I saw someone who gave me ten euros.

LivonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Middle Low German un, probably through Latvian un.

InterjectionEdit

un

  1. and

Louisiana Creole FrenchEdit

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one

LuxembourgishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • u (used before consonants other than d, h, n, t, z)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ana. The form is phonetically regular through the developments -a--ue- in originally open syllables, and -ue--u- before nasals.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

un (+ dative or accusative)

  1. on; at; to
    D’Biller hänken un der Wand.
    The pictures hang on the wall.

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Compare Breton unan, Cornish onan, Irish aon.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /eːn/, /ɯːn/, /uːn/

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one

Related termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French un, from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

un

  1. a, an

NumeralEdit

un (invariable)

  1. (cardinal) one

DescendantsEdit

  • French: un

Middle WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

un

  1. one

MutationEdit

Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal H-prothesis
un unchanged unchanged hun
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • Simon Evans (1964), A Grammar of Middle Welsh, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, § 1.

MirandeseEdit

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine ua)

  1. a, an

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • iun (Guernsey)

EtymologyEdit

From Old French uns, from Latin ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

ArticleEdit

un m

  1. a / an (masculine indefinite article)

Coordinate termsEdit

  • (gender): eune
  • (definiteness):

NumeralEdit

un m (feminine ieune)

  1. (Jersey, cardinal) one

NovialEdit

Novial cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : unesmi

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one



OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal un, from Latin ūnus (one).

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine una)

  1. a, an (masculine singular indefinite article)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnum, accusative singular of ūnus (one).

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

un

  1. a, an (masculine oblique singular indefinite article)
  2. a, an (masculine nominative plural indefinite article)

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one

DeclensionEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

ArticleEdit

un

  1. Alternative form of ũu

PalikurEdit

NounEdit

un n

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


PapiamentuEdit

Papiamentu cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un

NumeralEdit

un

  1. (cardinal) one (1)

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to German und, English and.

ConjunctionEdit

un

  1. and

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Moldavian) ун (un)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus, from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

un m, n (feminine singular o, plural niște)

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Usage notesEdit

Un is also used as a cardinal number (see unu and una).

O is used for feminine nouns:

un bărbata man (masculine)
un visa dream (neuter)
o femeiea woman (feminine)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

  • unu (used as a numeral/cardinal number)
  • unul (used as an indefinite pronoun)

Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German und

ConjunctionEdit

un

  1. and

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NumeralEdit

un (Cyrillic spelling ун)

  1. (Chakavian, cardinal) one (1)

SynonymsEdit


SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From unu, from Latin ūnus.

ArticleEdit

un m sg

  1. (indefinite) a, an

Usage notesEdit

Un is never used before words starting with the letter z or s and a consonant, like the Italian un

See alsoEdit

Sicilian articles
Masculine Feminine
indefinite singular un, nu na
definite singular lu, û la, â
definite plural li, î li, î

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *onъ.

DeterminerEdit

un

  1. (regional) that

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From uno, from Latin ūnus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

un m (apocopate, standard form uno)

  1. (before the noun) Apocopic form of uno one

Usage notesEdit

The form un is only used before and within the noun phrase of the masculine singular noun that it modifies. In other positions, uno is used instead.

ArticleEdit

un m (indefinite, plural unos, feminine una, feminine plural unas)

  1. a

TatarEdit

NumeralEdit

un (Cyrillic spelling ун)

  1. (cardinal) ten

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic [script needed] (un), from Proto-Turkic *hūn.

NounEdit

un (definite accusative unu, plural unlar)

  1. flour

DeclensionEdit


VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • on (rural areas)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūnus.

ArticleEdit

un m (feminine na)

  1. masculine singular indefinite article; a / an

See alsoEdit

Venetian articles (edit)
m sg f sg m pl f pl
Definite articles
(the)
el / al (Belluno)
l' (before vowels)
la
l' (mandatory before a, optional before other vowels)
i le / 'e (Padua)
Indefinite articles
(a / an)
un / on (rural) na - -

WelshEdit

Welsh cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : cyntaf
    Adverbial : unwaith
Welsh Wikipedia article on un

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh un, from Proto-Brythonic *ʉn, from Proto-Celtic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

un

  1. only

NumeralEdit

un

  1. one

NounEdit

un m (plural unau)

  1. one, individual

Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
un unchanged unchanged hun
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • un”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, 2014