See also: TENS

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tens

  1. plural of ten

Noun edit

tens pl (plural only)

  1. An inexact quantity or number, typically understood to be between 10 or 20 and 100.
    Synonym: dozens
    Our houses are tens of meters apart, so we don't have to worry about noise from our neighbours.
    tens of thousands of voters
    • 1987, w:Iain M. Banks, “Prologue”, in w:Consider Phlebas:
      Several tens of hours out on its first journey, while it was testing its track scanner by focusing back along the route it had taken, the ship registered a single massive annihilation explosion deep behind it, where the factory craft had been.
  2. (poker slang) A pair of tens.
  3. The period from a year 100x + 10 to a year 100x + 19 (mostly referring to the 1910s or 2010s). The teens, the oneties.

Usage notes edit

To express inexact number, dozens is much more common than tens, except when conveying order of magnitude, such as "tens of thousands [, millions, etc]".[1]

Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^
    2012, Susan Rothstein, “Numericals: counting, measuring and classifying”, in Proceedings of Sinn Und Bedeutung[1], volume 16, number 2, page 536, n.5:
    We can (marginally) say tens of people. We can certainly say tens of thousands of people

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin tēnsus. Compare the inherited doublet tes.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

tens (feminine tensa, masculine plural tensos, feminine plural tenses)

  1. tense, taut
    Antonym: lax

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tens

  1. second-person singular present indicative of tenir
  2. second-person singular present indicative of tindre

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tens

  1. (Balearics) first-person singular present indicative of tensar

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

tens

  1. (reintegrationist norm) second-person singular present indicative of ter

Middle English edit

Etymology edit

From Old French tens, tans, from Latin tempus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tens (plural tenses or tens)

  1. (grammar) tense

Descendants edit

  • English: tense

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin tempus.

Noun edit

tens oblique singularm (oblique plural tens, nominative singular tens, nominative plural tens)

  1. Alternative form of tans
    • 13th century, Unknown, La Vie de Saint Laurent, page 1, column 2, line 16:
      Ki trop i prent son tens i pert
      He who spends too much of his time on it suffers as a result

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin tenēs. Cognate with Galician tes and Spanish tienes. Also compare with vens.

Pronunciation edit

 

Verb edit

tens

  1. second-person singular present indicative of ter

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

tens

  1. indefinite genitive singular of ten

Anagrams edit