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See also: teñir

Contents

CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan tenir, from Vulgar Latin *tenīre, from Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō, from Proto-Italic *tenēō, stative from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tenir (first-person singular present tinc, past participle tingut)

  1. to have, possess
  2. to hold

ConjugationEdit

Irregular, though similar to prendre. Present (except 1st singular) and imperfect formed with stem ten-, remainder with stem tin-.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin tenīre from classical Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō.

VerbEdit

tenir

  1. to hold

ConjugationEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French tenir, from Old French tenir, from Vulgar Latin *tenīre, from Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō (hold, keep), from Proto-Italic *tenēō, stative from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tenir

  1. (transitive) to have; to hold
  2. (transitive) to keep
  3. (intransitive) to stay; to hold
  4. (reflexive, uncommon) to hold on
    Elle descend en se tenant aux racines.She comes down using the roots for handles (holding on to the roots).
  5. (reflexive) to hold oneself, to be standing
    Il se tenait dans le coin.He stood in the corner.
  6. (reflexive) to behave
    Tiens-toi bien.Behave yourself.
  7. (reflexive) to maintain, remain in a certain position or disposition
    Tiens-toi droit!Keep yourself straight!
    Elle se tient immobile sur la corde raide.She stays still on the tightrope.
  8. (followed by the preposition à) to be attached to something, to be fond of something, to hold something dear
  9. (reflexive, Quebec, slang) to hang out
    • 1975, Beau Dommage, "Le Vent d'la ville", Passagers, Capitol Record (ST-70.055 [V], 4XL56355 [K7], CDL-56355 [CD]):
      "J'me tenais dans l'ouest de la ville, ça me fait plus peur l'exil"
      I used to hang out in the west end; exile doesn't scare me anymore.

ConjugationEdit

This is a verb in a group of -ir verbs. All verbs ending in -tenir, such as contenir and détenir, are conjugated this way.

This is a verb in a group of -ir verbs. All verbs ending in -tenir, such as contenir and détenir, are conjugated this way.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

tenir

  1. past infinitive of tenar

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tenir.

NounEdit

tenir

  1. to hold

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (tenir, supplement)

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *tenīre, from Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō (hold, keep).

VerbEdit

tenir

  1. to possess; to have
  2. to hold

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has a stressed present stem tien distinct from the unstressed stem ten, as well as other irregularities. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *tenīre, from Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō (hold, keep).

VerbEdit

tenir

  1. to possess; to have
  2. to hold

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit