See also: taut- and ta ut

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English taught, toȝt(tight, distended), probably past participle of towen, toȝen(to tow, pull). Cognate with Scots tacht(taut).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

taut (comparative tauter, superlative tautest)

  1. Tight; under tension, as in a rope or bow string.
  2. Experiencing stress or anxiety.
    • 1989 Faye Kellerman, The Quality of Mercy
      His outward appearance was calm, but inside he was very taut.
  3. Containing only relevant parts, brief and controlled.
    • 2017 January 20, Annie Zaleski, “AFI sounds refreshed and rejuvenated on its 10th album, AFI (The Blood Album)”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      Guitarist Jade Puget and vocalist Davey Havok have distilled AFI’s strengths (a ferocious, post-hardcore rhythmic backbone; goth-tinctured, post-punky guitars; and Havok’s desperate, dramatic croon) into 14 taut, hook-driven songs.
    • 2007 Milton C. Sernett, Harriet Tubman: Myth, Memory and History
      Quick action and dialogue create a taut story, although it is illustration that shapes the characters.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

tense


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

taut

  1. Third-person singular present of tauen.
  2. Second-person plural present of tauen.
  3. Imperative plural of tauen.

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

tau +‎ -t

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɒut]
  • Hyphenation: ta‧ut

NounEdit

taut

  1. accusative singular of tau