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See also: tóco, tocó, tǫco, and toco-

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Shortening.

NounEdit

toco (plural tocos)

  1. Clipping of tocodynamometer.

Etymology 2Edit

From Hindi ठोको (ṭhoko), second-person plural imperative form of ठोकना (ṭhoknā, to strike, hit, beat), from Sauraseni Prakrit *𑀞𑁄𑀓𑁆𑀓𑀤𑀺 (*ṭhokkadi), from Ashokan Prakrit *𑀞𑁄𑀓𑀢𑀺 (*ṭhokati).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

toco (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, British slang) Corporal punishment; chastisement; beatings.
    • 1857, Hughes, Thomas, “Rugby and Football”, in Tom Brown's School Days[2], London: Macmilla and Co., published 1928, page 95:
      The School leaders come up furious, and administer toco to the wretched fags nearest at hand; they may well be angry, for it is all Lombard-street to a china orange that the School-house kick a goal with the ball touched in such a good place.
    • 1885, Gilbert, W[illiam] S[chwenck]; Sullivan, Arthur, The Mikado[3], act 1, London: G. Bell and Sons, published 1911, page 17:
      Yum-Yum: But as I'm engaged to Ko-Ko, / To embrace you thus, con fuoco, / Would distinctly be no gioco, / And for yam I should get toco
      Both: Toco, toco, toco, toco.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Tupian.

NounEdit

toco (plural tocos)

  1. a toco toucan
    • 2007, Les Beletsky, Bird Songs from Around the World, Chronicle Books (→ISBN), page 90:
      The Toco Toucan is surely among the most striking of the toucans, with its black-and-white body and enormous yellow-orange bill. [...] Tocos make loud rattling or clacking sounds with their bills.
    • 2014, R. Eric Miller, Murray E. Fowler, Fowler's Zoo and Wild Animal Medicine, Volume 8 - E-Book, Elsevier Health Sciences (→ISBN), page 234:
      Diabetes mellitus has been reported in tocos (R. toco) and keel-billed toucans.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

toco

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of tocar

GalicianEdit

 
A Toca Roman mine

Etymology 1Edit

From a substrate pre-Latin language, from Proto-Indo-European *tewh₂- (to swell).[1]

Akin to Spanish tocón (stump).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtoko̝/, (northwestern) /ˈtɔko̝/

AdjectiveEdit

toco m (feminine singular toca, masculine plural tocos, feminine plural tocas)

  1. maimed; one-handed; one-armed

NounEdit

toco m (plural tocos)

  1. burrow, den
    Synonyms: tobo, pala
  2. stump
    Synonyms: cepa, coto, cozo

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

toco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tocar

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Julian Santano Moreno (2004), “La familia del IE *teu-"hincharse" en las lenguas romances y en vasco. El sustrato indoeuropeo en la etimologia romance”, in Nouvelle revue d'onomastique[1], volume 43, issue 1, ISSN 0755-7752, pages 20

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

toco m (plural tocos)

  1. stub, stump (something cut short, blunted, or stunted)

VerbEdit

toco

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of tocar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtoko/, [ˈt̪oko]

VerbEdit

toco

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of tocar.