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See also: tolérance

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French tolerance, from Latin tolerantia (endurance), from tolerans, present participle of Latin tolerō (endure).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɒləɹəns/
  • (file)

NounEdit

tolerance (countable and uncountable, plural tolerances)

  1. (uncountable, obsolete) The ability to endure pain or hardship; endurance. [15th-19th c.]
  2. (uncountable) The ability or practice of tolerating; an acceptance of or patience with the beliefs, opinions or practices of others; a lack of bigotry. [from 18th c.]
  3. (uncountable) The ability of the body (or other organism) to resist the action of a poison, to cope with a dangerous drug or to survive infection by an organism. [from 19th c.]
  4. (countable) The variation or deviation from a standard, especially the maximum permitted variation in an engineering measurement. [from 20th c.]
  5. (uncountable) The ability of the body to accept a tissue graft without rejection. [from 20th c.]

AntonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

tolerance f

  1. tolerance (the ability or practice of tolerating)
  2. tolerance (permitted deviation from standard)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • tolerance in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • tolerance in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989