transpire

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French transpirer, from Latin transpirare ‎(to breathe through), from trans ‎(across) spirare ‎(to breathe).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

transpire ‎(third-person singular simple present transpires, present participle transpiring, simple past and past participle transpired)

  1. To give off (vapour, waste matter etc.); to exhale (an odour etc.). [from 16th c.]
  2. (obsolete) To perspire. [17th-19th c.]
  3. (botany) Of plants, to give off water and waste products through the stomata. [from 17th c.]
  4. To become known; to escape from secrecy. [from 18th c.]
    The proceedings of the council soon transpired.
    • De Quincey
      The story of Paulina's and Maximilian's mutual attachment had transpired through many of the travellers.
  5. (loosely) To happen, take place. [from 18th c.]
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 166:
      Although I was prevented from attending the 1952 annual conference, I was immediately informed as to what had transpired.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

GalicianEdit

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

transpire

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of transpirar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of transpirar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of transpirar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of transpirar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

transpire

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of transpirar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of transpirar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of transpirar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of transpirar.
Read in another language