utility

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English utilite, from Old French utilite, utilitet (usefulness), from Latin ūtilitās, from uti (to use). Surface etymology utile +‎ -ity.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /juːˈtɪl.ɪ.ti/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪlɪti

NounEdit

utility (countable and uncountable, plural utilities)

  1. The state or condition of being useful; usefulness.
  2. Something that is useful.
  3. (economics) The ability of a commodity to satisfy needs or wants; the satisfaction experienced by the consumer of that commodity.
  4. (philosophy) Well-being, satisfaction, pleasure, or happiness.
  5. (business, finance) A natural or legal areal monopoly distributer of a commodity (less often a service) delivered in continuous flows to multiple consumers from a common physical, infrastructural network, such as an electric company or water company; or, the securities of such a provider.
  6. (computing) A software program designed to perform a single task or a small range of tasks, often to help manage and tune computer hardware, an operating system or application software.
    I've bought a new disk utility that can recover deleted files.
    • 1982, InfoWorld (volume 4, number 10, page 35)
      The system includes an 8080 and a Z80 assembler, a Tektronix format downloader and other utilities.
  7. (sports) The ability to play multiple positions.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

utility

  1. Having to do with, or owned by, a service provider.
    utility line; utility bill
  2. (Of a building or its components) containing or intended for any of a building’s often-utility-related commodity transport, such as pipes or wires, or converting equipment, such as furnaces, water tanks or heaters, circuit breakers, central air conditioning units, laundry facilities, etc.
    utility room; utility corridor

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

utility m (plural utilitys)

  1. (sports) utility