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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English vicious, from Anglo-Norman vicious, (modern French vicieux), from Latin vitiōsus, from vitium (fault, vice). Equivalent to vice +‎ -ous.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈvɪʃəs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃəs

AdjectiveEdit

vicious (comparative viciouser or more vicious, superlative viciousest or most vicious)

  1. Violent, destructive and cruel.
  2. Savage and aggressive.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “2/9/1”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days:
      He had always been remarkably immune from such little ailments, and had only once in his life been ill, of a vicious pneumonia long ago at school. He hadn't the faintest idea what to with a cold in the head, he just took quinine and continued to blow his nose.
  3. (archaic) Pertaining to vice; characterised by immorality or depravity.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman vicious, from Latin vitiōsus; equivalent to vice +‎ -ous.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /visiˈuːs/, /visˈjuːs/, /ˈvisjus/

AdjectiveEdit

vicious (plural and weak singular viciouse)

  1. Iniquitous, sinful, wicked (often in a way that causes harm or vice to/in others)
  2. (rare) Lacking purity or cleanness; spoiled or defiled.
  3. (rare) Inaccurate, modified, or debased; of substandard quality.
  4. (rare) Injurious, dangerous; causing serious harm.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: vicious
  • Scots: veecious

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vicious m (oblique and nominative feminine singular viciouse)

  1. vicious; malicious
  2. defective; not capable of functioning

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit