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See also: Vice, více, and vice-

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /vaɪs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪs
  • Homophone: vise

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Latin vitium (fault or blemish).

NounEdit

vice (plural vices)

  1. A bad habit.
    Gluttony is a vice, not a virtue.
  2. (law) Any of various crimes related (depending on jurisdiction) to prostitution, pornography, gambling, alcohol, or drugs.
  3. A defect in the temper or behaviour of a horse, such as to make the animal dangerous, to injure its health, or to diminish its usefulness.
    • From the case of Scholefield v. Robb (1839). Gilligan, Brenda (2002) Practical Horse Law[1], →ISBN: “So a horse with say, navicular disease, making him suitable only for light hacking, would probably be unsound, whereas rearing would be a vice, being a "defect in the temper... making it dangerous". A vice can however render a horse unsound - possibly a crib biter will damage its wind.”
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French vis (screw, winding stairs), from Old French vis, viz, from Latin vitis (vine). Akin to English withy.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

vice (plural vices)

  1. A mechanical screw apparatus used for clamping or holding (also spelled vise).
  2. A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements.
  3. (obsolete) A grip or grasp.
  4. (architecture) A winding or spiral staircase.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

vice (third-person singular simple present vices, present participle vicing, simple past and past participle viced)

  1. To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, I. ii. 416:
      Camillo. As he had seen’t, or been an instrument / To vice you to't, that you have touched his queen / Forbiddenly
    • De Quincey
      The coachman's hand was viced between his upper and lower thigh.

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin vice (in place of), ablative form of vicis.

AdjectiveEdit

vice (not comparable)

  1. in place of; subordinate to; designating a person below another in rank
    vice president
    vice admiral
Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

vice

  1. instead of, in place of
    A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

vice

  1. in rows

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vītium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

vice

  1. instead of

AdverbEdit

vice

  1. instead

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vicem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vice m, f (invariable)

  1. deputy, substitute, vice

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vice

  1. ablative singular of vicis

PrepositionEdit

vice

  1. in place of, subordinate to

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

vīce

  1. vocative singular of vīcus

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French vice, borrowed from Latin vitium.

NounEdit

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice (bad habit)

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

vice m, f (plural vices)

  1. used as an abbreviation of any word containing the prefix vice-

SloveneEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

více f pl (genitive víc, plural only)

  1. purgatory

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

vice m, f (plural vice)

  1. vice (second in command)

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vice

  1. vice, second in rank, deputy, stand-in, acting

Related termsEdit