See also: WIG and wīǵ

EnglishEdit

 
Colorful wigs.

EtymologyEdit

Shortening of periwig, itself an alteration of French perruque. The meaning of "to reprimand" perhaps came from this being something a bigwig would do or perhaps from the expressions to flip one's wig, wigs on the green, or dash my wig!

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: wĭg, IPA(key): /wɪɡ/
  • (file)

Rhymes: -ɪɡ

NounEdit

wig (plural wigs)

  1. A head of real or synthetic hair worn on the head to disguise baldness, for cultural or religious reasons, for fashion, or by actors to help them better resemble the character they are portraying.
  2. A bigwig
    • 1959=50, William Makepeace Thackeray, Pendennis, ch 12
      Ye’ve been grossly deceived and put upon, Milly, and it’s my belief his old ruffian of an uncle in a wig is in the plot against us.
  3. (dated, among fishermen) An old seal.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

wig (third-person singular simple present wigs, present participle wigging, simple past and past participle wigged)

  1. To put on a wig; to provide with a wig (especially of an actor etc.).
  2. (transitive, colloquial) To upbraid, reprimand.
  3. (intransitive, colloquial, slang) To act in an extremely emotional way; to be overly excited, irritable, nervous, or fearful; behave erratically.
    That guy must be high. Look how he's wigging.
  4. (transitive, MLE, slang) To shoot in the head.
    • 2020, CR1 of Hoxton (lyrics and music), “EC1 Block Bully”‎[1], 1:26:
      And I don't know nothin bout slippin
      Zombie killer or rambo twinnin
      Or a long pole like scaffold
      Just tryna rise and aim and wig him

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch wig.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wig (plural wîe)

  1. wedge
  2. quoin

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch wegghe, from Old Dutch *weggi, from Proto-Germanic *wagjaz.

PronunciationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Jersey Dutch: wäx, wäxxi (from the diminutive)

NounEdit

wig f (plural wiggen, diminutive wiggetje n)

  1. wedge

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

wig

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐌲

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *wīg.

NounEdit

wīġ n

  1. (poetic or in compounds) war, battle
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of wēoh.

NounEdit

wīġ m

  1. idol
  2. (in compounds) holy, consecrated
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *wīg, from Proto-Germanic *wīgą, from Proto-Indo-European *weyk-.

NounEdit

wīg n

  1. war, battle
DeclensionEdit


Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *wigi, from Proto-Germanic *wigją, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ- (to carry; move; transport; ride).

NounEdit

wig n

  1. horse, steed
DeclensionEdit



WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English wig.

NounEdit

wig m or f (plural wigiau or wigs)

  1. wig

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
wig unchanged unchanged hwig
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “wig”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies