Last modified on 6 December 2014, at 03:34

Mars

See also: mars

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia

Mars astronomical symbol

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Borrowing from Latin Mars (god of war), from older Latin (older than 75 BC) Māvors. Mamers was his Oscan name. He was also known as Marmor, Marmar and Maris, the latter from the Etruscan deity Maris.

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology) The Roman god of war.
    Mars was the lover of Venus, and together they had daughter called Harmonia.
  2. (poetic) War; a personification of war.
    In the first half of the twentieth century, Mars devastated Europe.
    • 1918, Ruth Stanley Farnam, A Nation at Bay: What an American Woman Saw and Did in Suffering Serbia, page 57:
      Mars rode upon the storm of horror and drank his fill of pain and blood. When the Serbian Army retreated before the foe, four times its own strength, it went backward facing the enemy and fighting every step of the way.
    • 1944, McGraw-Hill, Engineering and Mining Journal, volume 145, page 54: 
      A relieved world then will eagerly turn to the task of reclaiming the destruction wrought by Mars ... A tremendous task, filled with infinite possibilities ... A profitable task, according to how well you are prepared to do your part in the rehabilitation ...
    • 1975, Helen Diane Russell, Jeffrey Blanchard, Jacques Callot: Prints & Related Drawings, Issue 21, page 10:
      The plague, inevitable companion of Mars, ravaged the populace.
  3. (astronomy) The fourth planet in the solar system. Symbol:
    Although no humans have ever been to Mars, we have sent dozens of robots there.
SynonymsEdit
  • (god of war): Ares
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

After Frank C. Mars, who founded the company that produces these chocolate bars.

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. The Mars Bar, a brand of chocolate bar with caramel and nougat filling.
    • 1985 — Michael Collier, Longest Day, p 206
      Easily eight foot tall, each was big, brown and glutinous - like giant Mars Bars squeezed and welded into nightmarish sculptures.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars m

  1. Mars

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. Mars

See alsoEdit

(planets of the solar system) planeter i solsystemet; Merkur,‎ Venus,‎ Jorden/‎jorden,‎ Mars,‎ Jupiter,‎ Saturn,‎ Uranus,‎ Neptun (Category: da:Planets) [edit]


DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars ?

  1. (Roman mythology, astronomy) Mars

EstonianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

EweEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. March

SynonymsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars m (genitive Mars)

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

HungarianEdit

Hungarian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia hu

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin Mars.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin Mars.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars m

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

DeclensionEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin Mars.

Proper nounEdit

Mars m (genitive Mhars)

  1. (Roman mythology, astronomy) Mars

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
Mars Mhars unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From older Latin (older than 75 BC) Māvors. Mamers was his Oscan name. He was also known as Marmor, Marmar and Maris, the latter from the Etruscan deity Maris.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mārs m (genitive Mārtis); third declension

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

NounEdit

Mārs m (genitive Mārtis); third declension

  1. war, battle, conflict

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative Mārs Mārtēs
genitive Mārtis Mārtum
dative Mārtī Mārtibus
accusative Mārtem Mārtēs
ablative Mārte Mārtibus
vocative Mārs Mārtēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


LatvianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars m

  1. vocative singular form of Marss

NorwegianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

See alsoEdit


PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars m

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mȁrs m (Cyrillic spelling Ма̏рс)

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Márs m anim (genitive Mársa)

  1. (planet, Roman mythology) Mars

DeclensionEdit

Planet:

God (or sometimes the planet):

See alsoEdit

(planets of the Solar System) planéti osónčja; Merkúr, Vénera, Zémlja, Márs, Júpiter, Satúrn, Urán, Neptún (Category: sl:Planets)


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. (Roman mythology, planet) Mars

See alsoEdit


TatarEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. Mars (planet)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English March.

Proper nounEdit

Mars

  1. March