Last modified on 11 August 2014, at 17:13

TranslingualEdit

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Wikipedia

LetterEdit

ch lower case (upper case CH, Ch)

  1. A digraph from c and h, considered an individual letter in some languages.

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AbbreviationEdit

ch

  1. chain - a unit of measurement equal to 22 yards

Etymology 2Edit

Aphetic form of ich, utch, ultimately from Old English .

PronounEdit

ch

  1. (obsolete, dialectal) Alternative form of I.

CzechEdit

LetterEdit

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Czech alphabet, after h and before i

EsperantoEdit

LetterEdit

ch

  1. A digraph used in the h-sistemo to represent ĉ.

See alsoEdit


LatvianEdit

LetterEdit

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. (obsolete) a letter used in older, pre-World-War-II Latvian spelling, but now replaced everywhere by h (upper case H)

Usage notesEdit

This letter can still be found in older books, or in books written by the Latvian diaspora prior to the fall of the Soviet Union. It used to represent the sound of IPA symbol /x/, as distinct from /h/; but since these sounds have merged as /x/ in current Latvian pronunciation, <h> (= /x/) is now used in all cases.


SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ch (upper case Ch)

  1. The sixteenth letter of the Slovak alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

LetterEdit

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. che, the fourth letter of the Spanish alphabet, after c and before d

Usage notesEdit

Since 1994, this letter has been treated as c followed by h for collation (sorting) purposes only. In 2010, this letter was officially removed by the RAE from the Spanish alphabet.


UzbekEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ch (upper case Ch)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Uzbek alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

LetterEdit

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. èch, the fourth letter of the Welsh alphabet, after c and before d

Usage notesEdit

Like the other Welsh digraphs, ch is considered a distinct letter of the Welsh alphabet for all purposes, including collation. Thus, chwech is alphabetically sorted after cyllell.