Last modified on 18 September 2014, at 06:37

EnglishEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch ic, from Old Dutch ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Low German ik, West Frisian ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg. See I (English, etymology 3).[1]

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ik

  1. First-person singular, subjective: I.

DeclensionEdit


QuotationsEdit

  • Julius Caesar
    Ik kwam, ik zag, ik overwon.
    I came, I saw, I conquered.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ik

  1. (in some dialects) I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik kem, ik sach, ik wünd.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)

Related termsEdit

  • mien (possessive: my, mine); mi (dative (also generally used in place of the accusative): me); wi (plural: we)

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

ik

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌺

LatvianEdit

AdverbEdit

ik

  1. every

MarshalleseEdit

NounEdit

ik

  1. Alternative spelling of ek.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ic (I, personal pronoun).

PronounEdit

ik

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) I.

DescendantsEdit

  • Scots: ik

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

PronounEdit

ik

  1. I

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: ic
    • Dutch: ik

Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

PronounEdit

ik

  1. I

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • West Frisian: ik

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

PronounEdit

ik

  1. I

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German Low German: ik

PlautdietschEdit

PronounEdit

ik

  1. I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik keem, ik keek, ik wun.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ic (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ek (I, pronoun).

PronounEdit

ik

  1. (rare) I. Now mostly used to be emphatical.
    Wha did that? Ik!(please add an English translation of this usage example)

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare North Frisian ick, Dutch ik, German Low German ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg.

PronounEdit

ik

  1. I