TranslingualEdit

LetterU.svg
Unicode name LATIN SMALL LETTER U
Codepoint U+0075
t ← Basic Latin → v

Etymology 1Edit

Latin V, from which U derived Minuscule variation of U, a modern variation of classical Latin V, from seventh century Old Latin adoption of Old Italic letter 𐌖 (V).

LetterEdit

u lower case (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

SymbolEdit

u

  1. (metrology) symbol for unified atomic mass unit
  2. (phonetics) Used in the International Phonetic Alphabet and in several romanization systems of non-Latin scripts to represent a close back rounded vowel (IPA(key): /u/).

See alsoEdit

Other representations of U:


EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter ᚢ (u, “ur”)

From Middle English lower case letter v (also written u), from Old English lower case u, from 7th century replacement by lower case u of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter (u, ur), derived from Raetic letter u.

Before the 1700s, the pointed form v was written at the beginning of a word, while a rounded form u was used elsewhere, regardless of sound. So whereas valor and excuse appeared as in modern printing, have and upon were printed haue and vpon. Eventually, in the 1700s, to differentiate between the consonant and vowel sounds, the v form was used to represent the consonant, and u the vowel sound. v then preceded u in the alphabet, but the order has since reversed.

PronunciationEdit

Letter name
Phoneme
Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “Canada”

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the English alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.
    I prefer the u in Arial to the one in Times New Roman.

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

u (plural ues)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U/u.
  2. A thing in the shape of the letter U

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

u (second person, singular or plural, nominative or objective)

  1. (abbreviation, slang, text messaging, Internet) you (in text messaging and internet conversations)
    Take me with u.

AbbreviationEdit

u

  1. Underwater.

Derived termsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch u.

PronounEdit

u

  1. (formal) you (singular, subject and object)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch uw.

DeterminerEdit

u

  1. (formal) your (singular)

See alsoEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *wa, from Proto-Indo-European *su̯om.

PronounEdit

u

  1. reflexive pronoun

AragoneseEdit

ConjunctionEdit

u

  1. or

AsturianEdit

ConjunctionEdit

u

  1. or

PronounEdit

u

  1. where (relative pronoun)

AdverbEdit

u

  1. where

Related termsEdit


AzeriEdit

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Azeri alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

u f (plural us)

  1. The Latin letter U (lowercase u).

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

u m (plural uns)

  1. (cardinal) one

CorsicanEdit

ArticleEdit

u m

  1. a, an

Related termsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

u + genitive

  1. at
  2. by

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally the accusative/dative form of jij/gij, from Middle Dutch u, from Old Dutch iu, from West Germanic *iwwiz, variant of Proto-Germanic *izwiz, dative/accusative of *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́. Compare West Frisian jo, Low German jo, ju, English you, German euch. The use as a nominative stems from an original genitive uwe edelheid (your gentlehood), which was later shortened to U E. and finally to u. See also jou.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

u

  1. (personal, second-person singular, subjective) you (polite).
    Bent u klaar? — “Are you ready?”
    Bent u er nog? — “Are you still there?”
  2. (personal, second-person singular, objective) you (polite).
    Ik zal het aan u geven. — “I will give it to you.”
    Dit zal niet werken voor u. — “This won’t work for you.”
  3. (personal, second-person singular, objective) thee (dialectal).
    Ik doe dat wel voor u. — “I’ll do it for thee.”
  4. (personal, second-person plural, subjective) you (polite).
    Hebt u die oefening gemaakt? — “Have you prepared that exercise?”
  5. (personal, second-person plural, objective) you (polite).
    Ze zullen dat wel voor u doen. — “They’ll do it for you.”
  6. (reflexive, second-person singular) thyself (dialectal)
    Gij hebt u niet gewassen. — “Thou hast not washed thyself.”
  7. (reflexive, second-person plural) yourselves (dialectal)
    Wast u eens. — “Wash yourselves.”

Usage notesEdit

  • The capitalization of u (as in U or Uw) is now considered old-fashioned, and no longer compulsory. In religious contexts, it is still often capitalized.
  • See usage notes at gij.

DeclensionEdit


LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Dutch alphabet.

See alsoEdit

  • Previous letter: t
  • Next letter: v

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Esperanto alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

u (plural u-oj, accusative singular u-on, accusative plural u-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U/u.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

u m, f (invariable)

  1. See under U

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

u

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ū (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter V.

Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

LatvianEdit

Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia lv

EtymologyEdit

Proposed in 1908 as part of the new Latvian spelling by the scientific commission headed by K. Mīlenbahs, which was accepted and began to be taught in schools in 1909. Prior to that, Latvian had been written in German Fraktur, and sporadically in Cyrillic.

PronunciationEdit

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LetterEdit

U

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Latvian alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

u m (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter U/u.

See alsoEdit


MalayEdit

LetterEdit

u

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Semitic. Cognate with Arabic وَ (wa), Hebrew וְ־ (v').

ConjunctionEdit

u

  1. and (used to connect two similar words, phrases, etc.)

Mauritian CreoleEdit

PronounEdit

u (informal to)

  1. Alternative spelling of ou.

See alsoEdit


NormanEdit

NounEdit

u m (plural uûs or uur)

  1. (anatomy) eye

NorwegianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (letter name): IPA(key): /ʉː/
  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /ʉː/, /ʉ/, /ʊ/

LetterEdit

u

  1. The 21st letter of the Norwegian alphabet

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin ubi

AdverbEdit

u

  1. (interrogative) where

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ubi.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

u

  1. where

DescendantsEdit

  • Galician: u
  • Portuguese: u

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *u, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

u (+ genitive)

  1. at

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Portuguese alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

NounEdit

u m (plural us)

  1. u (name of the letter U, u)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Portuguese u, from Latin ubi. Cognate with Galician u, French , Italian ove and Romanian iuo.

AdverbEdit

u

  1. (archaic) where
SynonymsEdit

PumpokolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔaw (/ *ʔu) ("thou").

PronounEdit

u

  1. you (second-person plural subjective)

SynonymsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

u (lowercase, capital U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Romanian alphabet representing the phoneme /u/. Preceded by ţ and followed by v.

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aut.

ConjunctionEdit

u

  1. or

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See Translingual section.

Alternative formsEdit

  • (uppercase) U

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

u (Cyrillic spelling у)

  1. The 27th letter of the Serbo-Croatian Latin alphabet (gajica), preceded by t and followed by v.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Slavic *u, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

u (Cyrillic spelling у)

  1. (with locative) in, at (without change of position, answering the question gdjȅ/gdȅ)
    biti u školi — to be in the school
    u c(ij)elom društvu — in the whole society
  2. (with accusative) to, into (with change of position, answering the question kùda)
    ići u školu — to go to school
    putovati u Ameriku — to travel to America
  3. (with accusative) on, in, at, during (in expressions concerning time)
    u podne — at noon
    u sr(ij)edu — on Wednesday
    u zoru — at dawn
    U koliko sati? — At what time?
  4. (with locative) in, during (in expressions concerning time)
    u jednom danu — in one day
    u mladosti — during one's youth

Skolt SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

u (upper case U)

  1. The thirty-first letter of the Skolt Sami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


SomaliEdit

PrepositionEdit

u

  1. to
  2. for

Usage notesEdit

  • In Somali, prepositions fall before the verb and not before the noun they modify:
    u sheeg -- to tell (lit. to call to)
    u keen -- to bring to

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The 22nd letter of the Spanish alphabet.

NounEdit

u f (plural úes)

  1. Name of the letter U.

Etymology 2Edit

ConjunctionEdit

u

  1. or
Usage notesEdit

Used instead of o when the following word starts with a vowel sound which is pronounced /o/.

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Letter name
Phoneme

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Swedish alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

TolaiEdit

PronounEdit

u

  1. Second-person singular pronoun: you (singular)

DeclensionEdit



Torres Strait CreoleEdit

NounEdit

u

  1. (eastern dialect) a mature coconut

Usage notesEdit

U is the sixth stage of coconut growth. It is preceded by pes and followed by drai koknat.


TurkishEdit

LetterEdit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Turkish alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

u

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U/u.

See alsoEdit


UzbekEdit

PronounEdit

u (Cyrillic у)

  1. Demonstrative pronoun used to indicate a thing that is far away from the speaker. that.
    • U eshik.
      That is a door. / That door.
Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 05:07