Last modified on 1 December 2014, at 00:19

damage

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Old French damage (Modern French dommage), from Vulgar Latin *damnaticum from Classical Latin damnum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

damage (countable and uncountable, plural damages)

  1. Injury or harm; the condition or measure of something not being intact.
    The storm did a lot of damage to the area.
    • Francis Bacon
      Great errors and absurdities many commit for want of a friend to tell them of them, to the great damage both of their fame and fortune.
  2. (slang) Cost or expense.
    "What's the damage?" he asked the waiter.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

damage (third-person singular simple present damages, present participle damaging, simple past and past participle damaged)

  1. To impair the soundness, goodness, or value of; to harm or cause destruction.
    Be careful not to damage any of the fragile items while unpacking them.
    • Clarendon
      He [] came up to the English admiral and gave him a broadside, with which he killed many of his men and damaged the ship.

TranslationsEdit

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Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Vulgar Latin *damnaticum from Classical Latin damnum.

NounEdit

damage m (oblique plural damages, nominative singular damages, nominative plural damage)

  1. damage
  2. injury, hurt, insult

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit