EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Trees in fog

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Origin uncertain; perhaps a back-formation from foggy. or perhaps related to the Dutch vocht and German feucht (moisture)

NounEdit

fog (countable and uncountable, plural fogs)

  1. (uncountable) A thick cloud that forms near the ground; the obscurity of such a cloud.
  2. (uncountable) A mist or film clouding a surface.
  3. A state of mind characterized by lethargy and confusion.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I was on my way to the door, but all at once, through the fog in my head, I began to sight one reef that I hadn't paid any attention to afore.
    He did so many drugs, he was still in a fog three months after going through detox.
  4. (photography) A silver deposit or other blur on a negative or developed photographic image.
Usage notesEdit
  • To count sense thick cloud, bank of fog is usually used.
  • To count sense clouding a surface, foggy patch is usually used.
SynonymsEdit
  • (cloud that forms at a low altitude and obscures vision): mist, haze
  • (mist or film clouding a surface): steam
  • (state of mind characterized by lethargy and confusion): daze, haze
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

fog (third-person singular simple present fogs, present participle fogging, simple past and past participle fogged)

  1. (intransitive) To become covered with or as if with fog.
  2. (intransitive) To become obscured in condensation or water.
    The mirror fogged every time he showered.
  3. (intransitive, photography) To become dim or obscure.
  4. (transitive) To cover with or as if with fog.
    • 1968, Eighth Annual Report, Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg, p 7:
      Fogging for adult mosquito control began on June 4th in residential areas. Until September 25th, the Metro area was fogged eleven times, using nine truck-mounted foggers, eight hand swing foggers, and two boats.
  5. (transitive) To obscure in condensation or water.
    • 2008, United States Congress, House Committee on Financial Services. Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity - Foreclosure, Foreclosure Prevention and Intervention: The Importance of Loss Mitigation, page 46:
      Unfortunately, the pendulum has swung way too far to the other end where the saying in the industry is is that if you could fog a mirror, you could get a loan.
  6. (transitive) To make confusing or obscure.
  7. (transitive, photography) To make dim or obscure.
  8. To practice in a small or mean way; to pettifog.
    • Dryden
      Where wouldst thou fog to get a fee?
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain; compare Norwegian fogg.

NounEdit

fog (uncountable)

  1. A new growth of grass appearing on a field that has been mowed or grazed.
  2. (UK, dialect) Tall and decaying grass left standing after the cutting or grazing season; foggage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  3. (Scotland) Moss.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fog (third-person singular simple present fogs, present participle fogging, simple past and past participle fogged)

  1. (transitive) To pasture cattle on the fog, or aftergrass, of; to eat off the fog from.

ReferencesEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *piŋi (tooth), the same root from which Finnish pii derives.

NounEdit

fog (plural fogak)

  1. (anatomy) tooth
    Ez a fog lyukas. - This tooth has a cavity.
  2. tooth, cog
    Egy átlagos hegyikerékpár hátsó fogaskerekein rendre 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 34 fogak vannak. - There are 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24 and 34 teeth on a standard mountain bike's rear sprockets.
  3. tooth (a sharp projection on a saw or similar implement)
    Az egyik foga hiányzik a fűrésznek. - One of the saw’s teeth is missing.
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Compound words
Expressions

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Ugric *puŋV- (to grasp, catch).[1]

VerbEdit

fog

  1. to grasp, to grip, to hold
    A fiú egy almát fog a kezében. - The boy is holding an apple in his hand.
  2. to catch, to take, to receive
    A macska egeret fogott. - The cat caught a mouse.
    Fogta a pénzt és elment. - He took the money and left.
    Nem tudom fogni az adást a tv-ben. - I can’t receive signals on the TV.
  3. will, going to (indicating future)
    Esni fog. - It will be raining.
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
Expressions
With verb prefixes
  • átfog verb
  • befog verb
  • belefog verb
  • egybefog verb
  • elfog verb
  • felfog verb
  • fölfog verb
  • hozzáfog verb
  • kifog verb
  • lefog verb
  • megfog verb
  • melléfog verb
  • nekifog verb
  • odafog verb
  • összefog verb
  • ráfog verb
  • visszafog verb
ReferencesEdit
  1. ^ Starostin's Uralic Database, Entry #1851

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

fog n (not commonly inflected)

  1. Valid cause, valid reason.
    Hon har fog för sin oro.
    "She has reason to be worried."
  2. (dated) Appropriate manner to proceed.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

fog c

  1. joint, seam
    Fogarna mellan kakelplattorna hade blivit missfärgade med åren.
    "The joints between the glazed tiles had become discoloured with the years."

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • foga
  • fogsvans
  • fogmassa
  • knaka i fogarna

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 10 April 2014, at 11:39