Last modified on 13 November 2014, at 20:00

wast

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wast

  1. (archaic) second-person singular simple past form of be
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act 4, Scene 2, (a hunting song),
      "Take thou no scorn to wear the horn, It was a crest ere thou wast born ..."
    • 1611, The Bible, King James (Authorised) Version, (first & last usages),
      Genesis 3:11 "And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?"
      Revelation 16:5 "And I heard the angel of the waters say, Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, because thou hast judged thus."
    • 1850, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Blessed Damozel, lines 97-99
      Alas! We two, we two, thou say'st!
      Yea, one wast thou with me
      That once of old.

ReferencesEdit

  • wast” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • wast” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wast

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of wassen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of wassen

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

wast

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌰𐍃𐍄

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Scots form of English west.

AdverbEdit

wast (comparative mair wast, superlative maist wast)

  1. west
  2. back, sideways; upstream

PrepositionEdit

wast

  1. west
  2. over, across
    She wis walkin wast the road. - She was walking across the road.

AdjectiveEdit

wast (comparative mair wast, superlative maist wast)

  1. west