Last modified on 17 August 2014, at 00:06

been

See also: ben and Ben

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ybeen, from Old English ġebēon, past participle of bēon (to be).

Alternative formsEdit

  • (obsolete): ybe (see y-).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

been

  1. past participle of be
  2. (obsolete) were
    Assembled been a senate grave and stout. — Fairfax.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English been, from Old English bēon (bees), nominative and accusative plural of bēo (bee). More at bee.

PronunciationEdit

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

been

  1. (UK dialectal) plural form of bee

See alsoEdit

  • be for forms of be

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Vaux, Bert and Scott Golder. 2003. The Harvard Dialect Survey: been. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Linguistics Department.


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *bēn, from Proto-Germanic *bainą. Compare West Frisian bien, German Bein, English bone, Danish ben.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

been n (plural benen, diminutive beentje n)

  1. (anatomy) leg, limb of a person, horse (other animals have poten) and certain objects (again many have poten)
    De benen van een passer. — The legs of a pair of compasses.
  2. (mathematics) side, leg
    De benen van een hoek. — The sides of an angle.

NounEdit

been n (plural beenderen or benen, diminutive beentje n)

  1. bone, constituent part of a skeleton.
  2. (uncountable) bone, the chalky material bones are made of

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

been

  1. first-person singular present indicative of benen
  2. imperative of benen

AnagramsEdit


Dutch Low SaxonEdit

NounEdit

been

  1. leg

See alsoEdit

  • German Low German: Been

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English beon, wesan.

VerbEdit

been

  1. to be
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      And I seide, “Ser, in his tyme maister Ioon Wiclef was holden of ful many men the grettis clerk that thei knewen lyuynge vpon erthe. And therwith he was named, as I gesse worthili, a passing reuli man and an innocent in al his lyuynge. And herfore grete men of kunnynge and other also drowen myche to him, and comownede ofte with him. And thei sauouriden so his loore that thei wroten it bisili and enforsiden hem to rulen hem theraftir… Maister Ion Aston taughte and wroot acordingli and ful bisili, where and whanne and to whom he myghte, and he vsid it himsilf, I gesse, right perfyghtli vnto his lyues eende. Also Filip of Repintoun whilis he was a chanoun of Leycetre, Nycol Herforde, dane Geffrey of Pikeringe, monke of Biland and a maistir dyuynyte, and Ioon Purueye, and manye other whiche weren holden rightwise men and prudent, taughten and wroten bisili this forseide lore of Wiclef, and conformeden hem therto. And with alle these men I was ofte homli and I comownede with hem long tyme and fele, and so bifore alle othir men I chees wilfulli to be enformed bi hem and of hem, and speciali of Wiclef himsilf, as of the moost vertuous and goodlich wise man that I herde of owhere either knew. And herfore of Wicleef speciali and of these men I toke the lore whiche I haue taughte and purpose to lyue aftir, if God wole, to my lyues ende.”

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: to be

ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

been

  1. past participle of be