See also: bier and Bie̩r

Alemannic German

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle High German bier, from Old High German bior, from Proto-West Germanic *beuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *beuzą (beer), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰews- (dross, sediment, brewer's yeast).

Cognate with German Bier, Dutch bier, English beer, Icelandic bjór. More at beer.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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Bier n (plural Bier)

  1. beer

Central Franconian

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle High German bier, from Old High German bior, from Proto-West Germanic *beuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *beuzą.

Noun

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Bier n or m (plural Bier)

  1. (many dialects) beer (drink)
Usage notes
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  • Masculine in southern Moselle Franconian, otherwise neuter.
Alternative forms
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  • Beer (western Moselle Franconian)

Etymology 2

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From Middle High German bēr, from Old High German bēr, from Proto-West Germanic *bair.

Noun

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Bier m (plural Biere)

  1. (most dialects) a male uncastrated pig; a boar
    Buur, Bär un Bier sinn drei kodde Dier.
    Farmer, bear and boar are three evil animals. (Old Colognian proverb expressing city-dwellers’ snobbery)
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German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German bier, from Old High German bior, from Proto-West Germanic *beuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *beuzą (beer), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰews-, *bheus- (dross, sediment, brewer's yeast).

Akin to Dutch bier, Low German Beer, bêr, English beer, Icelandic bjór. More at beer.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /biːɐ̯/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -iːɐ̯

Noun

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Bier n (strong, genitive Bieres or Biers, plural Biere or Bier, diminutive Bierchen n)

  1. (beverage) beer (alcoholic beverage fermented from starch material; a serving of this beverage)
  2. (figurative, informal) business, beeswax (personal affairs)
    Das ist nicht mein Bier!That's none of my business!

Usage notes

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  • As is common with beverages in German, the unchanged plural Bier can be used after numerals in the sense of “quantities of beer” (glasses, bottles, cans). One may order:
    Zwei Bier, bitte!
    Two beers, please!
    (Nota bene: In many places of the German language area, this is not a common order; instead one often specifies Pils, Weißbier, Kölsch, etc.)
  • The marked plural Biere is used to mean different kinds of beer.
    Pils und Kölsch sind beliebte deutsche Biere.
    Pils and Kölsch are popular German beers.

Declension

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Hyponyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Italian: birra (see there for further descendants)
  • Romanian: bere
  • Swedish: bir

Further reading

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  • Bier” in Duden online
  • Bier” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Bier”, in PONS (in German), Stuttgart: PONS GmbH, 2001–2024

Hunsrik

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Etymology

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Inherited from Central Franconian bier, from Old High German bior, from Proto-West Germanic *beuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *beuzą (beer), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰews-, *bheus- (dross, sediment, brewer's yeast).[1]

Cognate with German Bier.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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Bier n (nominative plural Biere)

  1. beer

Declension

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References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Piter Kehoma Boll (2021) “Bier”, in Dicionário Hunsriqueano Riograndense–Português [Riograndenser Hunsrickisch–Portuguese Dictionary]‎[1] (in Portuguese), 3 edition, Ivoti: Riograndenser Hunsrickisch

Luxembourgish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-West Germanic *berō, from Proto-Germanic *berô. Compare German Bär, English bear, Dutch beer.

Noun

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Bier m (plural Bieren)

  1. bear
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Old High German bira, from Latin pirum.

Noun

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Bier f (plural Bieren)

  1. pear
  2. light bulb
Alternative forms
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  • Bir (superseded in 2019)

Etymology 3

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From Proto-West Germanic *baʀi, from Proto-Germanic *bazją. Compare German Beere, Danish bær, English berry.

Noun

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Bier n (plural Bier)

  1. berry
Usage notes
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  • "Bier" can also mean "nut" or "bonce" (as in head) when used in Luxembourgish slang: i.e.: "wann's de dech net gëss, kriss de eng op d'Bier!" meaning "if you don't behave, you'll be hit in the head!"
Derived terms
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Pennsylvania German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German bier, from Old High German bior, from Proto-West Germanic *beuʀ.

Compare German Bier, Dutch bier, English beer.

Noun

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Bier n (plural Biere)

  1. beer

Derived terms

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