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EnglishEdit

 
Sus scrofa (1)
 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bor, boor, from Old English bār, from Proto-Germanic *bairaz (whence also Dutch beer, obsolete dialectal German Bär (boar)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoydʰ-s-o (compare Lithuanian baĩsas (terrible apparition), Old Church Slavonic бѣсъ (běsŭ, demon)), enlargement of *bʰoydʰ-. More at bad.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boar (plural boars or boar)

  1. A wild boar (Sus scrofa), the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig.
  2. A male pig.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch boer

NounEdit

boar m (definite singular boaren, indefinite plural boarar, definite plural boarane)

  1. (historical) a Boer

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin, Late Latin bovārius or boārius (cow herder), from Latin bovārius, boārius (of cattle), from bōs. Equivalent to bou +‎ -ar. Compare Aromanian buyear, French bouvier, Italian boaro, Portuguese boieiro, Spanish boyero.

NounEdit

boar m (plural boari)

  1. cowherd

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

boar c (plural boaren, diminutive boarke)

  1. drill, bore

Further readingEdit

  • boar”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

YolaEdit

NounEdit

boar

  1. hedgehog

ReferencesEdit

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)