See also: maius

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈmai̯.i̯us/, [ˈmäi̯ːʊs̠]
  • (modern Italianate Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈma.jus/, [ˈmäːjus]
  • Dictionaries or reference works sometimes mark the 'a' in the first syllable with a macron; however, the heavy weight of this syllable was not based on it containing a long vowel /aː/. Rather, this word was pronounced with /ajj/, a short vowel /a/ followed by a geminate consonant /jj/ (alternatively interpreted by some Latinists as /ai̯j/, a diphthong ending in -i̯- followed by the consonant /j/), as usual for Latin words with intervocalic -i-.[1][2]

Etymology 1 edit

From the goddess Maia, daughter of Atlas and mother of Mercury, whose name was either borrowed from Ancient Greek Μαῖα (Maîa, Maia) (from Ancient Greek μαῖα (maîa, lady)) or was originally a native Latin formation from a feminine suffixed form of Proto-Indo-European *méǵh₂s (great) that was eventually conflated with the Greek goddess.

Adjective edit

Maius (feminine Maia, neuter Maium); first/second-declension adjective

  1. (chiefly with mēnsis (month)) of May
Declension edit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative Maius Maia Maium Maiī Maiae Maia
Genitive Maiī Maiae Maiī Maiōrum Maiārum Maiōrum
Dative Maiō Maiō Maiīs
Accusative Maium Maiam Maium Maiōs Maiās Maia
Ablative Maiō Maiā Maiō Maiīs
Vocative Maie Maia Maium Maiī Maiae Maia

Proper noun edit

Maius m sg (genitive Maiī or Maī); second declension

  1. the month of May, May
Declension edit

Second-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Maius
Genitive Maiī
Maī1
Dative Maiō
Accusative Maium
Ablative Maiō
Vocative Maī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Descendants edit
  • Balkan: Romance
    • Aromanian: maiu
  • Italo-Romance:
  • North-Italian:
  • Gallo-Romance:
    • Franco-Provençal:
    • Old French: mays
      • Middle French: May
        • French: mai
          • Guianese Creole:
          • Haitian Creole: me
          • English: may
          • Iranian Persian: ⁧مه(me)
          • Louisiana Creole:
          • South Azerbaijani: ⁧مه()
          • Tunisian Arabic: ⁧ماي(mēy)
      • Norman: mai, mouai, me
      • Walloon: may
      • Middle English: May, Mai
        • English: May (see there for further descendants)
        • Scots: Mey
  • Occitano-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:
    • Aragonese: mayo
    • Ladino: mayo
    • Old Leonese:
    • Old Galician-Portuguese: mayo
      • Galician: maio
      • Portuguese: maio (see there for further descendants)
    • Spanish: mayo (see there for further descendants)
  • Insular Romance:
Borrowings
Unsorted borrowings

These borrowings are ultimately but perhaps not directly from Latin. They are organized into geographical and language family groups, not by etymology.

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ W. M. Lindsay (1894) The Latin Language, page 8:
    Cicero wrote ii to express the sound of the second element of an i-diphthong before a vowel (see ch. ii. § 55), e.g. aiio, Maiia, Aiiax (Quint, i. 4. II; Vel. Long. 7.54 K. : et in plerisque Cicero videtur auditu emensus scriptionem, qui et ‘Aiiacem’ et ‘Maiiam’ per duo i scribenda existimavit.
  2. ^ Nishimura, Kanehiro (2011), “Notes on Glide Treatment in Latin Orthography and Phonology: -iciō, servus, aiō”, in Historische Sprachforschung / Historical Linguistics, volume 124, page 193:
    It is well known that Latin orthography tends to avoid gemination of ⟨i⟩ for two successive -glides [...] The most classic case may be maior 'larger'; its phonological representation is /mai̯i̯or/ [...] the provision of a macron (i.e., māior, as if the vowel were long) in order to display the syllable weight — the way common in a number of grammar books and dictionaries — is utterly misleading in that it disguises the phonological reality. [...] Note also Cicero's preference for [...] "Maiiam" [...] Whatever the original Greek phonetic values of [...] Μαῖα, the glide seems to have at least phonetically filled both the coda of the first syllable and the onset of the second when borrowed into Latin (see Hoenigswald 1949: 394 and Godel 1953: 93).
  3. ^ Schumacher, Stefan; Matzinger, Joachim (2013) Die Verben des Altalbanischen: Belegwörterbuch, Vorgeschichte und Etymologie (Albanische Forschungen; 33) (in German), Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, →ISBN

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

An elliptical form of Maiusdeus (the great god”, “Jupiter), from maius (great, archaic form of magnus) +‎ deus (god).

Proper noun edit

Maius m sg (genitive Maiī or Maī); second declension

  1. great god (epithet of Jupiter)
Declension edit

Second-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Maius
Genitive Maiī
Maī1
Dative Maiō
Accusative Maium
Ablative Maiō
Vocative Maī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

References edit

  • Māius”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Māius”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Māius 1 Māius in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette