See also: May, May., mAy, maý, mày, máy, mây, mãy, and mấy

English edit

 May (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /meɪ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English mowen, mayen, moȝen, maȝen, from Old English magan, from Proto-West Germanic *magan, from Proto-Germanic *maganą, from Proto-Indo-European *megʰ-.

Cognate with Dutch mag (may, first and third-person singular of mogen (to be able to, be allowed to, may)), Low German mögen, German mag (like, first and third-person singular of mögen (to like, want, require)), Swedish , Icelandic mega, megum. See also might.

Alternative forms edit

Verb edit

may (third-person singular simple present may, no present participle, simple past might, no past participle)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To be strong; to have power (over). [8th–17th c.]
  2. (obsolete, auxiliary) To be able; can. [8th–17th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition II, section 3, member 6:
      But many times [] we give way to passions we may resist and will not.
  3. (intransitive, poetic) To be able to go. [from 9th c.]
  4. (modal auxiliary verb, defective) To have permission to, be allowed. Used in granting permission and in questions to make polite requests. [from 9th c.]
    Synonyms: can, could, might
    you may smoke outside;  may I sit there?
  5. (modal auxiliary verb, defective) Expressing a present possibility; possibly. [from 13th c.]
    Synonyms: could, might
    he may be lying;  Schrödinger's cat may or may not be in the box
    • 2011 October 1, Phil Dawkes, “Sunderland 2-2 West Brom”, in BBC Sport:
      The result may not quite give the Wearsiders a sweet ending to what has been a sour week, following allegations of sexual assault and drug possession against defender Titus Bramble, but it does at least demonstrate that their spirit remains strong in the face of adversity.
    • 2013 July 6, “The rise of smart beta”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68:
      Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.
  6. (subjunctive present, defective) Expressing a wish (with present subjunctive effect). [from 16th c.]
    Synonym: might
    may you win;  may the weather be sunny
    • 1974, Bob Dylan (lyrics and music), “Forever Young”, in Planet Waves:
      May God bless and keep you always / May your wishes all come true / May you always do for others / And let others do for you / May you build a ladder to the stars / And climb on every rung / May you stay forever young
    • 1984, “No More Lonely Nights”, performed by Paul McCartney:
      May I never miss the thrill of being near you
  7. Used in modesty, courtesy, or concession, or to soften a question or remark.
    • 1744 [1720], Matthew Prior, “Phillis's age”, in Joe Miller's Jests[1], 7th edition:
      How old may Phillis be, you ask, / Whose Beauty thus all Hearts engages.
Usage notes edit
  • May is now a defective verb. It has no infinitive, no past participle, and no future tense. Forms of to be allowed to are used to replace these missing tenses.
  • The simple past (both indicative and subjunctive) of may is might.
  • The present tense is negated as may not, which can be contracted to mayn't, although this is old-fashioned; the simple past is negated as might not, which can be contracted to mightn't.
  • May has archaic second-person singular present forms mayest and mayst.
  • Usage of this word in the sense of possibly is considered incorrect by some speakers and writers, as it blurs the meaning of the word in the sense have permission to. These speakers and writers prefer to use the word might instead.
  • Conversely, since may not is particularly likely to promote confusion between the senses of "will possibly not" and "is forbidden to," some rules for the drafting of laws and regulations proscribe "may not" and require the use of "must not" or similar for clarity. Example: [2]
  • Wishes are often cast in the imperative rather than the subjunctive mood, not using the word may, as in Have a great day! rather than May you have a great day. The use of may for this purpose may lend a more formal, literary, or solemn feeling (perhaps jocularly so) to the wish. Moreover, wishes in the subjunctive need not use may if the meaning is clear without it, which is the case mainly for established expressions in the third-person singular such as God help you.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

French mai, so called because it blossoms in the month of May.

Noun edit

may (uncountable)

  1. The hawthorn bush or its blossoms.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

may (third-person singular simple present mays, present participle maying, simple past and past participle mayed)

  1. (poetic, intransitive) To gather may, or flowers in general.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur Book XIX, Chapter i leaf 386v:
      Soo it befelle in the moneth of May / quene Gueneuer called vnto her knyȝtes of the table round / and she gafe them warnynge that erly vpon the morowe she wold ryde on mayeng in to woodes & feldes besyde westmynstre.
      "So it befell in the month of May, Queen Guenever called unto her knights of the Table Round; and she gave them warning that early upon the morrow she would ride a-Maying into woods and fields beside Westminster."
    • 1922, A. E. Housman, Last Poems, VII, lines 1-2:
      In valleys green and still / Where lovers wander maying
  2. (poetic, intransitive) To celebrate May Day.

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English may, maye (woman, maid, girl, virgin), from Old English mǣġ (kinswoman), from Proto-West Germanic *māg, from Proto-Germanic *mēgaz (kinsman). Related to Old English māge, mǣġe (kinswoman) and Old English mǣġ (kinsman).

Noun edit

may (plural mays)

  1. (archaic) A maiden.

Anagrams edit

Azerbaijani edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Russian май (maj).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

may (definite accusative mayı, plural maylar)

  1. (North Azerbaijani) May
    Synonym: (South Azerbaijani)مه()

Declension edit

    Declension of may
singular plural
nominative may
maylar
definite accusative mayı
mayları
dative maya
maylara
locative mayda
maylarda
ablative maydan
maylardan
definite genitive mayın
mayların
    Possessive forms of may
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) mayım maylarım
sənin (your) mayın mayların
onun (his/her/its) mayı mayları
bizim (our) mayımız maylarımız
sizin (your) mayınız maylarınız
onların (their) mayı or mayları mayları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) mayımı maylarımı
sənin (your) mayını maylarını
onun (his/her/its) mayını maylarını
bizim (our) mayımızı maylarımızı
sizin (your) mayınızı maylarınızı
onların (their) mayını or maylarını maylarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) mayıma maylarıma
sənin (your) mayına maylarına
onun (his/her/its) mayına maylarına
bizim (our) mayımıza maylarımıza
sizin (your) mayınıza maylarınıza
onların (their) mayına or maylarına maylarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) mayımda maylarımda
sənin (your) mayında maylarında
onun (his/her/its) mayında maylarında
bizim (our) mayımızda maylarımızda
sizin (your) mayınızda maylarınızda
onların (their) mayında or maylarında maylarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) mayımdan maylarımdan
sənin (your) mayından maylarından
onun (his/her/its) mayından maylarından
bizim (our) mayımızdan maylarımızdan
sizin (your) mayınızdan maylarınızdan
onların (their) mayından or maylarından maylarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) mayımın maylarımın
sənin (your) mayının maylarının
onun (his/her/its) mayının maylarının
bizim (our) mayımızın maylarımızın
sizin (your) mayınızın maylarınızın
onların (their) mayının or maylarının maylarının

See also edit

Bikol Central edit

Verb edit

may

  1. there is
  2. to have

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Crimean Tatar edit

Noun edit

may

  1. butter, oil

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Kalasha edit

Determiner edit

may

  1. my

Pronoun edit

may

  1. me

Mapudungun edit

Adverb edit

may (Raguileo spelling)

  1. yes

References edit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Northern Kurdish edit

Noun edit

may m

  1. intervention

Derived terms edit

Pacoh edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Katuic *maj, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *mi[i]ʔ.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

may

  1. you (second person singular pronoun)

Affixed forms edit

Quechua edit

Adverb edit

may

  1. where
  2. like, how, very

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Pronoun edit

may

  1. (interrogative pronoun) which

Verb edit

may

  1. (transitive) to fear

Conjugation edit

Tagalog edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈme/, [ˈmɛ]

Particle edit

may (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜌ᜔)

  1. particle used as an existential marker: to be; to have
    Synonyms: mayroon, meron
    Antonym: wala
    May tubig sa bahay.
    There is water in the house.
    May pagkain ako rito, sa'yo na lang.
    I have food here, have it.

Usage notes edit

  • May is used immediately after the thing possessed or existing, whereas mayroon can be separated by enclitics (e.g. lang, kaya, and ako). Sentences like *may ako pagkain would be ungrammatical.

See also edit

Preposition edit

may (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜌ᜔)

  1. used after sa: by; around; near
    Kunin mo ang araro doon sa may puno ng mangga.
    Get the shovel by the mango tree.
    (literally, “Get the shovel at the place with the mango tree.”)

Further reading edit

  • may”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tatar edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

may

  1. May (Month of the Year)

Declension edit

See also edit

Uzbek edit

 
Uzbek Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia uz

Etymology edit

From Russian май (maj), from Latin māius.

Noun edit

may (plural maylar)

  1. May

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Cognate with Muong băl.

Verb edit

may (𦁼, , )

  1. to sew
Derived terms edit
Derived terms

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Adjective edit

may (𢆧, , 𱜿, 𱝁, , 𠶣)

  1. lucky
    Synonym: hên
Derived terms edit
Derived terms

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

may (, )

  1. (now rarely in isolation) a cold breeze
See also edit
Derived terms

Walloon edit

 
Walloon Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia wa

Etymology edit

From Old French mai, from Latin Māius.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

may

  1. May (month)

See also edit