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Wiktionary:Requested entries (English)

See also: Missing entries (<180,000)
See also: the Tea room, where you can post the definition of a word you're trying to find, and hopefully someone will help you find it.
See also: Wiktionary:Requested entries (English)/diacritics and ligatures


Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Have an entry request? Add it to the list. - But please:

  • Think twice before adding long lists of words as they may be ignored.
  • If possible provide context, usage, field of relevance, etc.
  • Check the Wiktionary:Criteria for inclusion if you are unsure if it belongs in the dictionary.

Please remove entries from this list once they have been written (i.e. the link is “live”, shown in blue, and has a section for the correct language)

There are a few things you can do to help:

  • For inflected languages, if you see inflected forms (plurals, past tenses, superlatives, etc.) indicate the base form (singular, infinitive, absolute, etc.) of the requested term and the type of inflection used in the request.
  • For words in languages that don’t use Latin script but are listed here only in their romanized form, please add the correct form in the native script.
  • Don’t delete words just because you don’t know them — it may be that they are used only in certain contexts or are archaic or obsolete.
  • Don’t simply replace words with what you believe is the correct form. The form here may be rare or regional. Instead add the standard form and comment that the requested form seems to be an error in your experience.

Requested-entry pages for other languages: Category:Requested entries. See also: Wiktionary:Wanted entries/en.

Non-letterEdit

Non-letter 2019Edit

AEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A 2017Edit

A 2018Edit

It seems like this could be a misspelling of adjudicate or abjudicate. But see [2]. Cnilep (talk) 03:21, 6 March 2018 (UTC)
Seems SOP to me, equivalent to ‘the hand of an angel’, in this case used as a metaphor. — Vorziblix (talk · contribs) 23:44, 13 November 2018 (UTC)
Ʃkyp‑tar (talk) 94.109.249.185 (talk) 22:55, 1 September 2018 (UTC)
Is this an English word, or an Albanian one? Cnilep (talk) 08:17, 22 November 2018 (UTC)
  • archieparchy and archieparchies which may be alternate spellings of archeparchy and archeparchies? -- Beland (talk) 23:49, 14 September 2018 (UTC)
  • architectonic as a noun: e.g. Robert Young, "The Idea of a Chrestomathic University" in Logomachia: The Conflict of the Faculties, edited by Richard Rand (University of Nebraska Press, 1992), p. 107: "While Newman tries on the one hand, in the best Oxford fashion, to justify the idea of a university education as one of knowledge for its own sake, on the other he attempts to establish the place of theology as the faculty that functions as the architectonic, or Idea, of all the diverse knowledges in the university."

A 2019Edit

BEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

B 2017 and beforeEdit

Previously deleted as SoP. I have added a quote to both beta and uprising that uses the collocation. Cnilep (talk) 03:49, 11 October 2018 (UTC)
Tony Thorne's Dictionary of Contemporary Slang claims that the expression comes from the adjective boyed, which in turn comes from the verb to boy [3]. (We have the verb but not the adjective.) Dbfirs 22:13, 1 December 2015 (UTC)
I feel like I've heard this before. Maybe a common misconstruction/misspelling/slang alternative of bog off? Philmonte101 (talk) 13:35, 17 July 2016 (UTC)

B 2018Edit

Common enough phrase, perhaps in allusion to this 1781 book of sonnets. But the phrase doesn't seem very idiomatic. See bevy (a group) and beauty (one who is beautiful). SoP, ne c'est pas? Cnilep (talk) 03:35, 28 May 2018 (UTC)
I've always taken beyond me as a variant of beyond my ken. We have beyond one's ken, but I'm not sure what to do about beyond one / beyond me. Free Dictionary has it from Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. OED Online has to be beyond a person as a sub-sense of beyond. Cnilep (talk) 06:06, 16 May 2018 (UTC)
Green's Dictionary of Slang gives "police car" for berry, but suggests it comes from the red lights rather than the blue uniforms. I added that sense. Cnilep (talk) 05:19, 20 June 2018 (UTC)

B 2019Edit

  • backbarrow as used in old British place names. There used to be a Backbarrowbridge, Manchester, England, which I found in my genealogical research. There still exists a Backbarrow, and a Backbarrow Bridge in the Lakes region. I was wondering what a backbarrow, or back barrow, is. (I know what a bridge is!)
  • black ace: something in hockey, a reserve or substitute player of some kind?
  • break the wheel as an expression probably started off in Game of Thrones, but it is branching out. Is probably a hot word already.
  • buster in a sense relating to an age or generation – Sheila Liming, "Of Anarchy and Amateurism: Zine Publication and Print Dissent," pp. 138–9 (citing Stephen Duncombe, Notes from Underground [1997]): "This, however, is much more the result of the relationship between zines and specific, newly commodifiable cultural communities—be they punks, the Riot Grrrls of the early 1990s, or merely the generation of 'busters, x-ers, twentysomethings, etc.,' as they are variously labeled by Duncombe (131)—than the result of the media form itself."
    • Liming quotes Duncombe, who quotes Laura Zinn's "Move Over, Boomers: The Busters are Here", a 1992 article about Generation X. I'm not yet convinced, though, that this chain of references is sufficiently independent for WT:ATTEST. Cnilep (talk) 06:00, 11 September 2019 (UTC)
  • butter woman, butta woman (light-skinned prostitute from Santo Domingo, implied to be infected with HIV), found in My Brother by Jamaica Kincaid
  • brazy - a slang word used in hip hop and rap, a blend of Blood and crazy, as in The Bloods gang from Los Angeles.
  • blowpipery - OneLook - Google "blowpipery" (BooksGroupsScholar) - pertaining to a blowpipe. Andy Mabbett (Pigsonthewing); Talk to Andy; Andy's edits 14:33, 27 August 2019 (UTC) -- This seems to appear in only one book (and is a noun, not an adj). Equinox 18:16, 27 August 2019 (UTC)

CEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

C 2017 and beforeEdit

SOP - this is just an attributive form for city beat, which is a beat that covers the city. Kiwima (talk) 03:43, 24 August 2017 (UTC)
It seems your prediction has come true -- no results past Feb 2017. I'd say no article. GeneralPericles (talk) 01:17, 20 January 2018 (UTC)
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/are-people-identifying-as-clovergender/ says updated 30 January 2018 though, and https://www.ajc.com/news/national/the-most-outrageous-things-pharma-bro-martin-shkreli-has-ever-said-done/68JI85EScKwjwwJvXYsEYL/ came out September 2017 and http://instinctmagazine.com/post/martin-shkreli-sentenced-prison was March 2018. Perhaps we should reconsider if clovergendered is worth of a page. http://faktograf.hr/2017/11/22/istina-o-istanbulskoj-vigilare/ shows it's even made it into non-English news coverage. ScratchMarshall (talk) 01:59, 23 June 2018 (UTC)

C 2018Edit

That's just a diminutive of cozzer. The entry would go at cozzie under an different etymology. Dbfirs 08:37, 9 November 2018 (UTC)

C 2019Edit

DEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

D 2017 and beforeEdit

Every instance I've found so far was either (co)authored by Rex LaMore (a professor at Michigan State) or written about him. Cnilep (talk) 23:46, 23 November 2018 (UTC)

D 2018Edit

With a space draft house is sometimes used as the name of a place (pub, restaurant, bar) serving draft beer. According to the Alamo Drafthouse cinema's web site, "We pride ourselves in serving the finest craft beers", so the name may be alluding to that. Cnilep (talk) 05:12, 6 October 2018 (UTC)
Maybe not; I guess we can't be expected to be a comprehensive list of initialisms &c. I wonder if there's any precedent for corporation-specific lemmas? Azertus (talk) 10:53, 17 September 2018 (UTC)
  • dod-rot, dod-rotted – Philip Foner's introduction to We, the Other People: Alternative Declarations of Independence by Labor Groups, Farmers, Woman’s Rights Advocates, Socialists, and Blacks, 1829–1975 (University of Illinois Press, 1976), p. 27, quotes a tract published in the Coast Seamen's Journal in 1894 that exhorts the reader to "comport yourself generally like a dod-rotted lunatic." See Merriam-Webster, Green's Dictionary of Slang.

D 2019Edit

EEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

E 2017 and beforeEdit

E 2018Edit

E 2019Edit

  • echimyine: a member of genus Echimys (spiny tree-rats), or of the tribe Echimyini, etc.? what exactly?

FEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

F 2017 and beforeEdit

See front "face up to; confront" + up intensifier, or front up.

F 2018Edit

Compare hand-to-mouth, hand to mouth

F 2019Edit

GEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

G 2017 and beforeEdit

See down: "With on, negative about, hostile to".

G 2018Edit

G 2019Edit

  • gachapon / gashapon -Ultimateria (talk) 21:09, 9 May 2019 (UTC)
  • genrefication - OneLook - Google "genrefication" (BooksGroupsScholar) - just a typo for gentrification?
  • geozone: cf. biozone?
  • global heating term now preferred by some sources over "global warming" and "climate change".[21][22][23] On en.wp it is currently a redirect to global warming.
  • gowpin ([24]) - Cockney, possibly pronunciation spelling. Probably some part of a chest.__Gamren (talk) 18:32, 20 February 2019 (UTC)
  • grenado (an additional meaning: a decorative architectural feature of some sort?) "There exists at Blickling a rough drawing, signed 'Robert Lemyng', for a garden banqueting house (97), much in the style of the house (and incidentally reproducing details from Serlio like the crowning grenado) upon which he has addressed notes to Sir Henry Hobart, showing that he expected his client to modify it." James Lees-Milne, Tudor Renaissance (London: B. T. Batsford Ltd, 1951, p. 107). - I think that must be a "pineapple finial" SemperBlotto (talk) 06:17, 3 August 2019 (UTC)

HEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

H 2017 and beforeEdit

Could this be haem written with a ligature? That's the nearest thing I can find. Compare hæmoglobin. Cnilep (talk) 03:33, 25 December 2017 (UTC)

H 2018Edit

H 2019Edit

IEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

I 2017 and beforeEdit

As I read "The present and future of the Australasian colonies" (1883) from which that quote comes, the author is arguing that Australasian colonies are separate from one another, notwithstanding their relationship with Britain. In other words, since Australia and, say, New Zealand are not intestine (within a given country), a war between them would not be civil war. Cnilep (talk) 00:54, 23 September 2016 (UTC)

I 2018Edit

I 2019Edit

JEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

J 2018 and beforeEdit

KEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

K 2017 and beforeEdit

K 2018Edit

LEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

L 2017 and beforeEdit

L 2018Edit

Possibly a one-off: The Little Book of Lykke is the follow-up to The Little Book of Hygge. Unlike hygge, I'm not seeing much uptake. Cnilep (talk) 02:07, 9 March 2018 (UTC)

L 2019Edit

MEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

M 2017 and beforeEdit

M 2018Edit

M 2019Edit

NEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

N 2017 and beforeEdit

I don't know... Reading this, it seems like the term might be SOP. See Norway + model. PseudoSkull (talk) 03:08, 22 October 2016 (UTC)

N 2018Edit

N 2019Edit

OEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

O 2014-2017Edit

O 2018Edit

O 2019Edit

PEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

P 2017 and beforeEdit

I wouldn't be able to answer that without knowing what "right face" and "perfect right face" mean.__Gamren (talk) 17:38, 21 January 2018 (UTC)
@Kiwima.__Gamren (talk) 18:00, 12 June 2018 (UTC)
A right face is a turn to the right, a perfect right face is when the maneuver is done neatly, with the entire body turning like a board, and everyone doing it in sync. Kiwima (talk) 21:46, 12 June 2018 (UTC)
Thanks. Most of the cites I found were in a military context, so I labeled it "especially military".__Gamren (talk) 09:25, 13 June 2018 (UTC)
  • police ambulance: probably an ambulance staffed by police, for e.g. violent or dangerous patients
If nothing else, could we find a quoted source of some kind to substantiate the phrase's usage? (just to have a place to start) Ozelot911 (talk) 14:37, 20 December 2017 (UTC)
I heard it in the 1960s Outer Limits TV series. Can also be found in Google Books. Equinox 15:48, 21 December 2017 (UTC)

P 2018Edit

P 2019Edit

Yes, a very American word that I would never use here in the UK (I'd always say "put into production") but others have used it in print! There are two cites for "productionise" in the OED! I've also found lots of cites from Google Books for the noun "productionisation" (to match your definition), but not for the z form in Ngrams, though they appear in a plain search of Google Books. I wonder why? Dbfirs 17:29, 29 July 2019 (UTC)

QEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Q 2019Edit

Q 2018Edit

  • Queen's Cowboys (Canada): Royal Canadian Mounted Police; in reference to the Stetson hats worn by RCMP members in ceremonial dress (red serge) and to the origin of the force where they were often the only representatives of the British Crown and later, the Canadian government, in rural parts of Canada.

REdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

R 2017 and beforeEdit

Apparently Korean for "hamlet, village cluster", it is a unit of governance in the DPRK. Cnilep (talk) 02:54, 19 April 2018 (UTC)
  • rouanne
    • The OED entry for maverick quotes the Overland Monthly of August 1869 for a possible etymology:
      • One Maverick formerly owned such immense herds that many of his animals unavoidably escaped his rouanne in the spring, were taken up by his neighbors, branded and called ‘mavericks’.
        • Escaped his rouanne? It's French for the horse colour 'roan' and for the kind of compass you stick into the boy in front's bottom in a quiet maths class, but I can't see what it means here. --46.226.49.229 14:53, 5 January 2017 (UTC)
          • rouanne, rouannette are also apparently (obsolete?) French for "a mark (for casks)": the above would seem to refer to animals escaping a cattle brand so that other farmers manage to claim them instead. Equinox 15:57, 6 July 2018 (UTC)
  • rapid-cycle - OneLook - Google "rapid-cycle" (BooksGroupsScholar) ways
  • real GDP - OneLook - Google "real GDP" (BooksGroupsScholar)
SoP? See the economics sense of real + GDP; generally contrasted with nominal GDP. Seems rather more encyclopedic than usual Wiktionary fare. Cnilep (talk) 06:12, 8 June 2017 (UTC)

R 2018Edit

R 2019Edit

SEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

S 2017 and beforeEdit

Yes, both the American sense of corruption and the British sense of hard work for both noun and verb seem to have appeared independently in the 1850s. The British sense is cited from 1853 in the OED. I've only recently heard the American sense here in the UK. Dbfirs 18:20, 5 July 2019 (UTC)
  • same shoe - I'm told it is a fairly common idiom, basically meaning "same thing", as in: "I would not buy this book." "Same shoe." (i.e. "Me neither.")
  • Stellæ
See stellae, stella. Cnilep (talk) 06:01, 22 February 2017 (UTC)
  • stenopæic
  • think the sun shines out of someone's ass (could be bum, backside etc, and could be "act like","treat like", "as far as he's concerned" etc)
  • sutorious — adjectives from the Latin sūtōrius (of or belonging to a shoemaker or cobbler)
Apparently sutorian is a variant of sutorial. There is a plant genus Sutorious and possibly some bird species, but I can't find the word used as an adjective. Cnilep (talk) 08:18, 19 July 2016 (UTC)
OED gives this as a variant of sutorial with one exemplar, Thomas Blount's Glossographia. Blount defines Sutorious (sutorius) as “belonging to a Shoomaker, or Sewer”. The word appears just after Sutor (“a Shoomaker, a Sewer”), which he notes is Latin. Sutorius does not appear in Blount's (1707) Glossographia Anglicana Nova. I haven't found other examples in English. I would say that sutorious is a Latin word, not sufficiently attested in English. Cnilep (talk) 02:17, 25 January 2018 (UTC)
Isn't this SOP? Kiwima (talk) 22:49, 8 December 2016 (UTC)
  • schweff: slang for a flirt or "mack", a man who is (or tries to be) good with the ladies? Is in Partridge's slang dictionary. Equinox 06:19, 18 November 2016 (UTC)
While Partridge emphasizes flirting, attestations on the web seem like comments on masculinity and social class – a bit like a (US) douchebag or a twit. [31], [32] Cnilep (talk) 04:19, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
I can only find cites by one author (Alexander Macalister) - it seams to be some sort of sheath in the shoulder joint of an insect. Need cites by more authors. Kiwima (talk) 04:43, 4 December 2016 (UTC)
Doesn't this seem sort of SoP? (Just saying that because I also found spinning kick. Could one find the definition of this term at spinning + backfist? Philmonte101 (talk) 04:55, 1 August 2016 (UTC)
I can only find two actual usages - one in the bible and one in a novel of the life of David - all else is just commentary on or speculation about the meaning of the word. This is not sufficient to meet our attestation criteria. Kiwima (talk) 02:31, 30 July 2017 (UTC)
I can't find it in recent books. It is attested on the web, mainly from 2016-2017. There are currently entries for both SJW and -tard. Since the suffix is productive, there could be any number of similar terms with sporadic attestation. Cnilep (talk) 03:57, 31 January 2018 (UTC)

S 2018Edit

  • Hmmm... doesn't seem attested to me. That's unfortunate; looks like an interesting entry if it exists. Can @Kiwima find any citations for this? PseudoSkull (talk) 02:42, 23 March 2018 (UTC)
Yeah, I looked and didn't find it either. Kiwima (talk) 03:21, 23 March 2018 (UTC)
Geertz & Geertz call it a “term [] in Balinese” and use italics on first mention (p. 30). Is it attested as a loanword in English? There is no request page for Balinese, but I wonder if editors on Wiktionary:Requested entries (Indonesian) could help with the Balinese lemma? Cnilep (talk) 02:57, 31 January 2018 (UTC)

S 2019Edit

TEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

T 2016 and beforeEdit

See torpedo slang sense, “a large breast; breast with a large nipple”. Cnilep (talk) 01:33, 29 January 2018 (UTC)

T 2017Edit

    • 2008, Prøveoplæg Til Kulturfagene, Gyldendal Uddannelse →ISBN, page 171
      I kilde 3 finder du en kritik af, at indvandrere "systematisk" forskelsbehandles, ...
      In source 3, you will find a critique of the fact that immigrants are "systematically" discriminated against, ...

except the original author doesn't explicitly express that the fact that immigrants are systematically discriminated against is in fact a fact. I also do not know what POS to give it, if I were to make the entry.__Gamren (talk) 18:09, 29 April 2017 (UTC)

Feels SoP to me, since it's not always a fact ("I hate the idea that artists suffer more than anyone else"), and "the fact that X" can be used as a normal NP anywhere. Equinox 18:21, 29 April 2017 (UTC)

T 2018Edit

The 2018Edit

In some cases adding "the" definitely changes the meaning (like "underground" meaning below-ground generally vs. "the underground" meaning the subway). In some cases it does not, and the core word or phrase is all that's needed. It's unclear to me in which cases usage notes should be added to the core word or phrase vs. creating a separate entry, and in which cases redirects should be created. These were all previously at Appendix:English idioms; I weeded out the ones that were obviously not needed. -- Beland (talk) 08:24, 16 June 2018 (UTC)

Consider Both London and Moscow have undergrounds. I can't name a city with more than 5 million in population that shouldn't have an underground. Different determiners (including the "zero" determiner), different referents, same semantics for the noun. The performs its normal function of specifying the most salient (eg, local) instance of the noun it determines. In London "the underground" refers to all or part of their system. There may be some instances where the makes some other semantic change, but I am sure those instances are rare. DCDuring (talk) 23:22, 11 September 2018 (UTC)
Examples are the finger and the man. Such cases are rare indeed.  --Lambiam 15:30, 6 October 2018 (UTC)
In addition, do you suggest that we have separate entries for attributive use of the nouns whenever such use is attested, even though the noun's semantics are the same? DCDuring (talk) 23:43, 11 September 2018 (UTC)
I'm not from the UK, so I'm not confident in my ability to judge correct usage. Those examples sound plausible, so then underground probably covers it. It currently lists "underground" in the sense of the stuff below the surface of the Earth as an adjective, so that would explain why using "the" restricts the meaning to "subway" or "secret organization". For "secret organization" there's just a note that "the" is usually used with the noun, and that seems sufficient to me. I'll drop it from this todo list. As for the other listings, I think we need to think through them on a case-by-case basis to see how firmly attatched to "the" they are, and whether this justifies a separate listing, usage note, or neither. -- Beland (talk) 18:23, 18 October 2018 (UTC)

T 2019Edit

There is no verb to teeth in modern English (though Johnson's dictionary of 1755 had it). Do you mean teethe? Dbfirs 16:51, 5 July 2019 (UTC)

UEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

U 2018Edit

U 2019Edit

VEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

V 2018 and beforeEdit

2019Edit

WEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

W 2012-2017Edit

Just a mis-spelling (and I hope you don't mind my dated spelling of misspelling (latest OED example is from 1898)) Dbfirs 16:47, 5 July 2019 (UTC)

W 2018Edit

W 2019Edit

Do you mean whoe'er? We needed that entry. Dbfirs 07:48, 3 July 2019 (UTC) Now added. Dbfirs 07:54, 3 July 2019 (UTC)
  • write-what-where - OneLook - Google "write-what-where" (BooksGroupsScholar) - {{lb|en|computer security}}
  • wolf-pad - ??? (a carved foot on furniture?) "The sculptural ornamentation, in the grotesque figures and wolf-pads on the sarcophagus, shows the new influence of the Low Countries, that was by now making rapid encroachments upon English Renaissance design." James Lees-Milne, Tudor Renaissance (London, B. T. Batsford Ltd, 1951, p. 36).

XEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

X 2018Edit

This still lacks its own entry, but is now an alternative forms on Generation X Mcavoybickford (talk) 16:40, 26 December 2018 (UTC)

X 2019Edit

YEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Y 2012-2017Edit

Y 2018Edit

Y 2019Edit

Not in big OED. Does anyone have a dictionary of Scottish slang? Dbfirs 07:42, 3 July 2019 (UTC)
The Scottish National Dictionary includes it as a diminutive of Scots yank (tremendous lie). I would not be surprised to find it in/called English, as the line between the languages is hazy. Cnilep (talk) 04:42, 23 July 2019 (UTC)

ZEdit

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Z 2015Edit

Z 2019Edit

Unfortunately, that is the only use I can find of the term as a verb. Kiwima (talk) 23:46, 18 July 2019 (UTC)

References and notesEdit

This section is meant to assist in the production of definitions by providing supporting citations. Wherever possible, please keep supporting evidence with the entries it is meant to be supporting.