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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

absolute +‎ -ly, from Middle English.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /æb.səˈluːt.li/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌæb.səˈlut.li/, /ˈæb.səˌlut.li/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

absolutely (not comparable)

  1. In an absolute or unconditional manner; utterly, positively, wholly. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
  2. Independently; viewed without relation to other things or factors. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
  3. (grammar) In a manner that does not take an object.

Usage notesEdit

  • Absolutely is not to be confused with intensives such as very or indeed, as it is an unconditional term.

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

absolutely

  1. Yes; certainly; expression indicating strong agreement. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]

Usage notesEdit

  • Some commentators, especially in England, criticise the interjectional use as having no useful meaning beyond that of yes;[2] however, this assumes that emphasis is useless, which, pragmatically speaking, it isn’t.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], →ISBN), page 9
  2. ^ Christopher Howse; Richard Preston (2007) She Literally Exploded: The Daily Telegraph Infuriating Phrasebook, London: Constable and Robinson, →ISBN, page 3.