English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle French intensif, from Medieval Latin intensivus, from Latin intensus, from intendere; related to intend.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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intensive (comparative more intensive, superlative most intensive)

  1. Thorough; to a great degree; with intensity.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page vii:
      Secondly, I continue to base my concepts on intensive study of a limited suite of collections, rather than superficial study of every packet that comes to hand.
  2. Demanding; requiring a great amount of work etc.
    This job is difficult because it is so labour-intensive.
  3. Highly concentrated.
    I took a three-day intensive course in finance.
  4. (obsolete) Stretched; allowing intension, or increase of degree; that can be intensified.
    • a. 1677 (date written), Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature, London: [] William Godbid, for William Shrowsbery, [], published 1677, →OCLC:
      the intensive distance between the perfection of an Angel and of a Man is but finite
  5. Characterized by persistence; intent; assiduous.
    • c. 1635 (date written), Henry Wotton, “Of Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex; and George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham: Some Observations by Way of Parallel in the Time of Their Estates of Favour”, in Reliquiæ Wottonianæ. Or, A Collection of Lives, Letters, Poems; [], London: [] Thomas Maxey, for R[ichard] Marriot, G[abriel] Bedel, and T[imothy] Garthwait, published 1651, →OCLC, page 3:
      Some therefore vvere of opinion, that [] vvith that aſſiduous attendance, and intenſive circumſpection vvhich a long indulgent fortune did require, he vvas grovvn not unvvilling, for his ovvn eaſe, to beſtovv handſomly upon another ſome part of the pains, and perhaps of the envie.
  6. (linguistics) Serving to give force or emphasis.
    an intensive verb or preposition
  7. (medicine) Related to the need to manage life-threatening conditions by means of sophisticated life support and monitoring.
    She was moved to the intensive-care unit of the hospital.

Derived terms

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Translations

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See also

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Noun

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intensive (plural intensives)

  1. (linguistics) A form of a word with a stronger or more forceful sense than the root on which the intensive is built.
  2. A course taught intensively.
    • 2017, Wendy Hasenkamp, Janna R. White, The Monastery and the Microscope, page 372:
      Beginning in 2014, ETSI embarked on a six-year implementation phase at three monastic universities (Sera, Ganden, and Drepung). This program is composed of summer intensives taught by faculty from Emory and other institutions, []

References

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  • intensive”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams

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French

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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intensive

  1. feminine singular of intensif

German

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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intensive

  1. inflection of intensiv:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian

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Adjective

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intensive f pl

  1. feminine plural of intensivo

Anagrams

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Adjective

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intensive

  1. inflection of intensiv:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Adjective

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intensive

  1. inflection of intensiv:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Swedish

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Adjective

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intensive

  1. definite natural masculine singular of intensiv