See also: Echt, écht, and -echt

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German echt (real). The German term originates from Middle Low German echt (lawful, genuine), contraction of ehacht, variant form of ehaft (lawful, pertaining to the law) from ê(e) (law, marriage). First use in English appears c. 1916.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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echt (comparative more echt, superlative most echt)

  1. Proper, real, genuine, true to type.
    • 1980, Anthony Burgess, Earthly Powers, Penguin, page 8:
      I had heard [the phrase] in Lamb House, Rye, but it was less echt Henry James than Henry James mocking echt Meredith.
    • 2002 March 27, Buck Turgidson, “Heebetudinous”, in alt.california[1] (Usenet):
      And yes, that's what it's about. Some punk writing about sleeping with Ginsberg, despite their fifty-year age difference and homogenous sexuality. What's echt heebish? There's your answer. A hack fag poet and the power to plant him on playlists nationwide.
    • 2009 January 18, Ross Douthat, “When Buckley Met Reagan”, in New York Times[2]:
      An echt Burkean with a snob’s disdain for the contemporary Republican Party, Hart hinted at a road not taken [] .

Translations

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Anagrams

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Czech

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German echt, from Middle High German echt, from Middle Low German echt.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈɛxt]
  • Hyphenation: echt

Adjective

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echt (indeclinable)

  1. (colloquial) echt, genuine, pure, unadulterated
    Synonyms: nefalšovaný, opravdový, ryzí

Derived terms

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adjective
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adverb

Further reading

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  • echt in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • echt in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • echt in Internetová jazyková příručka

Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Dutch echt, from Old Dutch *ēhaft, from Proto-West Germanic *aiwahaft.

Adjective

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echt (comparative echter, superlative echtst)

  1. authentic, true, genuine, real
    Synonyms: waar, heus
    Antonyms: onecht, nep, vals
    Dit is een echt kunstwerk, geen kopie.
    This is an authentic artwork, not a copy.
    Hij heeft een echte diamant gekocht.
    He bought a genuine diamond.
    Ze speelt de rol van een echte prinses in het toneelstuk.
    She plays the role of a real princess in the play.
    Het tweede schilderij is echter dan het eerste.
    The second painting is more authentic than the first.
    Zijn argumenten zijn echter dan die van haar.
    His arguments are truer than hers.
    Dit is het echtste verhaal dat ik ooit heb gehoord.
    This is the most authentic story I have ever heard.
    Hij heeft de echtste glimlach.
    He has the truest smile.
Inflection
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Declension of echt
uninflected echt
inflected echte
comparative echter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial echt echter het echtst
het echtste
indefinite m./f. sing. echte echtere echtste
n. sing. echt echter echtste
plural echte echtere echtste
definite echte echtere echtste
partitive echts echters
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Afrikaans: eg
  • Petjo: echt, echies
  • Papiamentu: echt

Etymology 2

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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echt m (uncountable)

  1. The institution marriage, matrimony.
    Synonym: huwelijk
    Hij gelooft sterk in het belang van echt en gezin.
    He strongly believes in the importance of marriage and family.
    In sommige culturen is echt nog steeds een heilige verbintenis.
    In some cultures, matrimony is still considered a sacred bond.
    Ze heeft haar hele leven toegewijd aan het verdedigen van het concept van echt als hoeksteen van de samenleving.
    She has dedicated her entire life to defending the concept of marriage as the cornerstone of society.
Derived terms
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Descendants
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German

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle High German echt, borrowed from Middle Low German echt (lawful, genuine). The original form is Middle Low German ēhaft (lawful), from ē (law) (related to modern Ehe); then ēhacht by the Low German development -ft--cht- (compare Nichte); and eventually contracted into echt. Cognate to Old High German ēhaft (honourable) and Dutch echt.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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echt (strong nominative masculine singular echter, comparative echter, superlative am echtesten)

  1. authentic, genuine, true
    Die Jacke ist aus echtem Leder.
    The jacket is made of genuine leather.
    • 1994, “Es möchte echt sein”, in In Echt, performed by Die Sterne:
      Hallo Lexikon, erklär mir wie das funktioniert / Es möchte echt sein / Echt
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
  2. (chiefly colloquial) real; factual
    Synonyms: wirklich, tatsächlich
    Der Film ist nah an der echten Geschichte.
    The film is close to the real story.
  3. (mathematics) proper
    echte Teilmengeproper subset

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Adverb

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echt

  1. (chiefly colloquial) really; indeed
    Synonym: wirklich
    Das war echt gut.That was really good.

Interjection

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echt

  1. expresses disbelief or shock at new information
    Synonym: wirklich
    "Ich lebe erst seit 2 Jahren in Deutschland." "Echt? Du sprichst sehr gut Deutsch.""I've only been living in Germany for 2 years." "Really? Your German is very good."

Further reading

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  • echt” in Duden online
  • echt” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Kashubian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German echt.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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echt (indeclinable)

  1. authentic, genuine, true

Further reading

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  • echt”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Scots

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Etymology 1

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Scots numbers (edit)
 ←  7 8 9  → 
    Cardinal: echt
    Ordinal: echt

Inherited from Middle English eighte, aught, eahte, ahte, from Old English eahta, from Proto-West Germanic *ahtō, from Proto-Germanic *ahtōu, from Proto-Indo-European *oḱtṓw.

Alternative forms

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Numeral

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echt

  1. eight

Etymology 2

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Inherited from Middle English eiȝtthe, from Old English eahtoþa, from Proto-Germanic *ahtudô.

Alternative forms

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Adjective

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echt

  1. eighth

Etymology 3

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Verb

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echt

  1. Alternative form of aicht

References

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