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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin alluvius (alluvial), from alluviō (an overflowing, inundation), from alluō (wash against).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /əˈluː.vi.əl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

alluvial (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to the soil deposited by a stream.
    • 1992, Anna K. Behrensmeyer & Robert W. Hook, "Paleoenvironmental Contexts and Taphonomic Modes" in, Terrestrial Ecosystems through Time, page 35.
      Soils are a prominent feature of floodplain environments, and we include them in this section because most of the available information on ancient soils pertains to alluvial examples, aside from those in Quaternary-Recent time.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

alluvial (plural alluvials)

  1. A deposition of sediment over a long period of time by a river; an alluvial layer.
  2. Alluvial soil; specifically, in Australia, gold-bearing alluvial soil.

Usage notesEdit

  • The noun is normally used in the plural by engineers who recover valuable minerals from these layers.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

alluvial (feminine singular alluviale, masculine plural alluviaux, feminine plural alluviales)

  1. alluvial

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

alluvial (not comparable)

  1. alluvial

DeclensionEdit