See also: Baco, baço, and bacò

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin *bacius, formed from *bombacius, a variant of Latin bombyx.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baco m (plural bachi)

  1. maggot, worm
  2. flaw
  3. bug (in a computer program)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

baco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bacare

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Frankish *bakō (ham, flitch).

NounEdit

bacō m (genitive bacōnis); third declension[1][2]

  1. (Medieval Latin) flitch of bacon

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bacō bacōnēs
Genitive bacōnis bacōnum
Dative bacōnī bacōnibus
Accusative bacōnem bacōnēs
Ablative bacōne bacōnibus
Vocative bacō bacōnēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “baco”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 76
  2. ^ baco in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

MinangkabauEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay baca, from Sanskrit वाचा (vācā, speech, voice).

VerbEdit

baco

  1. to read

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baco f

  1. vocative singular of bacă