See also: Balle, ballé, ballē, ballë, and Bälle

AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

balle

  1. plural of bal

DutchEdit

VerbEdit

balle

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of ballen

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bal/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French balle, from northern Italian balla.

NounEdit

balle f (plural balles)

  1. (small) ball
    balle de golf
    golf ball
    balle de tennis
    tennis ball
  2. bullet
  3. (colloquial) franc (French franc), euro
Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Portuguese: bala

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French balle (large bundle, package), from Old French bale (rolled-up bundle, packet of goods) and Medieval Latin bala, of Germanic origin. Doublet of English ball.

NounEdit

balle f (plural balles)

  1. bundle of goods, packet tied and held together with string

Etymology 3Edit

From Gaulish *balu.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

balle f (uncountable)

  1. chaff (inedible casing of a grain seed)

ReferencesEdit

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

balle

  1. inflection of ballen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbal.le/
  • Rhymes: -alle
  • Hyphenation: bàl‧le

NounEdit

balle f

  1. plural of balla

AnagramsEdit


LatvianEdit

 
Balle

EtymologyEdit

From French bal (a dance).

NounEdit

balle f (5th declension)

  1. ball (old-fashioned spacious, luxurious dancing party)
    balles tērpsball dress, clothes
    zaļumu balleopen-air ball, dancing party
    masku ballemasquerade (lit. mask ball)
  2. (colloquial) a small party, with food and drinks
    vakar pēc sapulces ceplī bijusi īsta balleyesterday after the meeting in the kiln there was a real ball

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

balle f (5th declension)

  1. point (on a scale), grade, level
    atzīmes 10-ballu skalāmarks on a 10-point scale

DeclensionEdit


LimburgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From bal +‎ -e.

VerbEdit

balle

  1. (intransitive) to play with a ball
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

balle

  1. inflection of bal:
    1. (some dialects, mainly West Limburgish) nominative plural
    2. (archaic) accusative singular

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

balle

  1. Alternative form of bal

Middle FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From northern Italian balla (ball).

NounEdit

balle f (plural balles)

  1. ball (spherical object used in games)
    1. small metal ball used as artillery
DescendantsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French balle, from Frankish *balla, from Proto-Germanic *ballô, *balluz (ball).

NounEdit

balle f (plural balles)

  1. bundle
DescendantsEdit

MooreEdit

EtymologyEdit

from French balle

NounEdit

balle

  1. ball (object)

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of Germanic origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

balle f (plural balles)

  1. (Jersey) ball
  2. (Jersey) bullet

Derived termsEdit


Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈpalle/

VerbEdit

balle

  1. inflection of ballat:
    1. first-person dual present indicative
    2. third-person plural past indicative

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

AdjectiveEdit

balle

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of ball.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Swedish balder, baller, from Old Norse bǫllr, from Proto-Germanic *balluz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, inflate, swell). Doublet of boll and bulle. Compare Old English bealluc, English bollock, Danish balde (buttock).

NounEdit

balle c (colloquial)

  1. penis; shlong
  2. (usually in the plural) testicle
  3. (Southern) buttock
DeclensionEdit
Declension of balle 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative balle ballen ballar ballarna
Genitive balles ballens ballars ballarnas

Etymology 3Edit

Originally derived from ballen, a contraction of balkongen (the balcony).

NounEdit

balle c (colloquial)

  1. (humorous) balcony
    • 2021 April 21, Patrik Isaksson, “patrikisakssonofficial”, in Instagram[1]:
      Sitter på ballen nu å njuter. Hoppas ni har en härlig dag.
      Sitting on the balcony now enjoying. Hope you have a wonderful day.
    • 2021 September 21, Kenza Zouiten, “Sitter på ballen med en kall cola”, in Kenzas.se[2]:
      Jag har hittat internet ute på ballen! Inte så stark signalstyrka dock så det går lite segt…
      I found internet out on the balcony! Not so strong signal strength though so it's a bit slow…

ReferencesEdit