EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /beɪ̯l/, [ˈbeɪ̯(ə)ɫ], [beə̯ɫ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: bail

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bale (evil), from Old English bealu, from Proto-West Germanic *balu, from Proto-Germanic *balwą.

Cognate with Low German bal- (bad, ill), Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌻𐍅𐌴𐌹𐌽𐍃 (balweins, torture), Old High German balo (destruction), Old Norse bǫl (disaster).

NounEdit

bale (uncountable)

  1. Evil, especially considered as an active force for destruction or death.
  2. Suffering, woe, torment.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bale (pyre, funeral pyre), from Old English bǣl (pyre, funeral pyre), from Proto-Germanic *bēlą (pyre), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to shine; gleam; sparkle). Cognate with Old Norse bál (which may have been the direct source for the English word).

NounEdit

bale (plural bales)

  1. (obsolete) A large fire, a conflagration or bonfire.
  2. (archaic) A funeral pyre.
  3. (archaic) A beacon-fire.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English bale (bale), from Old French bale and Medieval Latin bala, of Germanic origin. Doublet of ball.

 
Round straw bales in Germany

NounEdit

bale (plural bales)

  1. A rounded bundle or package of goods in a cloth cover, and corded for storage or transportation.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 563:
      So having made up my mind, I packed up in bales a quantity of precious stuffs suited for sea-trade and repaired with them from Baghdad-city to Bassorah-town, where I found ship ready for sea, and in her a company of considerable merchants.
  2. A bundle of compressed wool or hay, compacted for shipping and handling.
  3. A measurement of hay equal to 10 flakes. Approximately 70-90 lbs (32-41 kg).
  4. A measurement of paper equal to 10 reams.
  5. A block of compressed cannabis.
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
Further readingEdit

VerbEdit

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (transitive) To wrap into a bale.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Alternative spelling of bail.

VerbEdit

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (Britain, nautical) To remove water from a boat with buckets etc.
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


BugineseEdit

NounEdit

bale

  1. fish

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of balen

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Gaulish *balu.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bale f (uncountable)

  1. chaff (inedible casing of a grain seed)

Further readingEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French balai.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bale

  1. broom

VerbEdit

bale

  1. to sweep

JavaneseEdit

NounEdit

bale

  1. Dated spelling of balé.

KapampanganEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bəˈle/, [bəˈlɛː]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧le

NounEdit

balé

  1. house

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English bealu, from Proto-West Germanic *balu, from Proto-Germanic *balwą.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bale (plural bales)

  1. An evil or wrong act; a bad deed.
  2. Maliciousness, iniquity, damage.
  3. Devastation and doom; the causing of lifelessness.
  4. Woe or torment; hurting, agony.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: bale (dated)
ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bale

  1. decisive, ruinous, vicious
  2. tormentuous, painful, hurtful
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Either from Old English bǣl, Old Norse bál, or a conflation of both; in any case, from Proto-Germanic *bēlą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bale

  1. Any large fire; a bonfire or pyre.
  2. A fire for inhumation; a funeral pyre.
  3. A fire for execution or killing.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Probably borrowed from Old French bale, balle, from Medieval Latin balla, from Frankish or Old High German balla (ball), from Proto-Germanic *balluz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bale (plural bales)

  1. A bale (rounded bundle)
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

bale (present tense balar, past tense bala, past participle bala, passive infinitive balast, present participle balande, imperative bale/bal)

  1. Alternative form of bala

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

VerbEdit

bale

  1. inflection of balar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative
  2. inflection of balir:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin root *baba. Compare French bave, Italian bava, Spanish and Portuguese baba. The normal result, *ba, is not used as the singular has been replaced with bală through analogy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bale f pl (plural only)

  1. slobber, drool, dribble, saliva

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaːlə/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧le

VerbEdit

bale

  1. (intransitive) to speak

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “bale”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

bale

  1. inflection of balar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

TagalogEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish vale, third-person singular present indicative form of valer (to be worth), from Old Spanish valer. Compare Chavacano vale.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧le
  • IPA(key): /ˈbale/, [ˈbɐ.le]
  • Rhymes: -ale

NounEdit

bale

  1. (colloquial) worth; value (usually used in the negative)
  2. promissory note; credit; IOU
  3. request of partial advanced payment

AdverbEdit

bale

  1. used to connect previous conversation or events to the following question: so
  2. used before stating or enumerating the gist or summary of what is being discussed
  3. used as a meaningless filler word to begin a response or when one cannot start to speak

AdjectiveEdit

bale

  1. (colloquial) valuable; important
  2. bought on credit

Derived termsEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French ballet.

NounEdit

bale (definite accusative baleyi, plural baleler)

  1. ballet