See also: Barker

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English berkere; equivalent to bark (dog noise) +‎ -er.

Noun

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barker (plural barkers)

  1. Someone or something who barks.
    Synonym: (obsolete) latrant
    My neighbor's dog is a constant barker that keeps me awake at night.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, 1st Australian edition, Sydney, N.S.W.: Ure Smith, published 1962, →OCLC, page 42:
      Edmund was barker on sight, like foolish stay-at-home dogs.
  2. A person employed to solicit customers by calling out to passersby, e.g. at a carnival.
    Synonyms: tout, (Australia) spruiker
    Hyponym: doorsman
    Bob had amassed a considerable stockpile of double entendres from his days working as a barker for a strip joint.
    • 1893, James Otis, The Adventures of a Country Boy at a Country Fair[1]:
      [] this fakir was doing a big business, as was shown by the fact that he could afford to hire a barker, who cried continually at the full strength of his lungs: "Come up now, and try your luck! [] "
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly[2], volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
  3. A shelf-talker.
  4. (video games) A video game mode where the action is demonstrated to entice someone to play the game.
    The barker looks action-packed, but actually playing the game is rather dull
  5. (slang, dated) A pistol.
    Synonym: barking iron
    • 1838, Boz [pseudonym; Charles Dickens], Oliver Twist; or, The Parish Boy’s Progress. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I, II, or III), London: Richard Bentley, [], →OCLC:
      Barney, opening a cupboard, brought forth several articles, which he hastily crammed into the pockets.
      Barkers for me, Barney," said Toby Crackit.
      “Here they are,” replied Barney, producing a pair of pistols.
    • 1969, George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman, page 45:
      Parkin, the Oxford Street gunmaker, sent me a brace of barkers in silver mountings, with my initials engraved—good for trade, I imagine.
  6. The spotted redshank.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Middle English barker; equivalent to bark (surface of tree) +‎ -er.

Noun

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barker (plural barkers)

  1. (historical) A person who removes needed or valuable tree bark, as on a cinnamon or cinchona plantation.
    The profession of barker has been made largely obsolete by the realization that in most cases saplings can be cultivated far more profitably.
  2. (obsolete) A tanner.
    The profession of barker has been made largely obsolete by the introduction of more effective tanning agents, but it lives on as a surname.
  3. A machine used to remove unneeded bark from wood.
    Run these logs through the barker so we can use them as fence posts.
Translations
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Anagrams

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Danish

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Noun

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barker

  1. indefinite plural of bark

Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From bark +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barker (plural barkers)

  1. tanner, barker

Descendants

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  • English: barker

References

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Noun

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barker m

  1. indefinite plural of bark

Tagalog

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English barker.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barker (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜇ᜔ᜃᜒᜇ᜔)

  1. barker that calls out passengers at a public transportation terminal

Further reading

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  • barker”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018