See also: Bestia, bèstia, bestią, and bestía

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

bestia f (plural bestias)

  1. beast

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

bes- +‎ tia

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bestia f (plural besties)

  1. great-aunt

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin bēstia. Cognate to biscia, which is not borrowed but inherited.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bestia f (plural bestie)

  1. beast

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

The origin is unknown. A Proto-Indo-European preform *dʰwēstiā has been proposed, from the root dʰwēs- (to breathe) (compare Gothic 𐌳𐌹𐌿𐍃 (dius) from *dʰews- (to breathe); more at English deer), but this is uncertain, since an initial f- would be expected in Latin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bēstia f (genitive bēstiae); first declension

  1. a beast

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bēstia bēstiae
Genitive bēstiae bēstiārum
Dative bēstiae bēstiīs
Accusative bēstiam bēstiās
Ablative bēstiā bēstiīs
Vocative bēstia bēstiae

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

bēstiā

  1. ablative singular of bēstia

ReferencesEdit

  • bestia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • bestia in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • bestia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • bestia in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • bestia in William Smith, editor, A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray, 1848
  • De Vaan, Michiel, “bestia”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[1], Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2008, →ISBN, page 71
  • Ernout, Alfred; Meillet, Antoine, “bestia”, in Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine: histoire des mots (in French), with additions and corrections of André J., 4th edition, Paris: Klincksieck, 2001, page 69b
  • Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist, “bestia”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume I, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1938, page 102
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume I, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, 1959, page 269

Old PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bestia f

  1. Alternative form of besta

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese besta and Spanish bestia.

NounEdit

bestia

  1. beast
  2. animal

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin bēstia[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛ.stja/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bestia f

  1. beast (non-human animal)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brückner, Aleksander, Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish), Warsaw: Wiedza Powszechna, 1927, published 1985

Further readingEdit

  • bestia in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

bestia

  1. definite nominative singular of bestie
  2. definite accusative singular of bestie

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) biestg
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) bestga
  • (Puter, Vallader) bes-cha

EtymologyEdit

From Latin bēstia.

NounEdit

bestia f (plural bestias)

  1. (Sursilvan) animal

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) animal
  • (Sursilvan) tier

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Latin bēstia. Compare English beast.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbestja/, [ˈbes.t̪ja]
  • (file)

NounEdit

bestia f (plural bestias)

  1. beast
  2. animal
  3. (derogatory) brute (person who acts stupidly)

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin bestia. Doublet of bìsa.

NounEdit

bestia f (plural bestie)

  1. animal
  2. beast
  3. insect