English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English bestial, from Old French bestial, from Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia (beast) (whence English beast).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

bestial (comparative more bestial, superlative most bestial)

  1. (literally and figuratively) Beast-like
Synonyms edit
Hypernyms edit
Derived terms edit
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Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Scots bestiall, from Middle English bestaile, from Old French bestaille, from Late Latin bēstiālia; later reinforced and remodelled on Middle French bestial, itself from Late Latin bēstiālis.

Noun edit

bestial pl (plural only)

  1. (Scotland, obsolete) Cattle.
    • 1845, The New Statistical Account of Scotland: Forfar, Kincardine, page 94:
      [] much must depend upon the way in which bestial are bought or reared, and the state of the markets when they are sold.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia (beast).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

bestial (feminine bestiale, masculine plural bestiaux, feminine plural bestiales)

  1. bestial

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Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia (beast).

Adjective edit

bestial m or f (plural bestiais)

  1. beastly
  2. massive, huge, giant
  3. tremendous, fantastic, awesome

Related terms edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French bestial, from Late Latin bēstiālis.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /bɛstiˈaːl/, /ˈbɛstial/, /ˈbɛːstial/

Adjective edit

bestial

  1. animal (of or pertaining to animals)
  2. physical; non-spiritual (of faculties, knowledge, etc.)
  3. beastly, depraved (lacking human sensibility)
  4. stupid, unlearned

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: bestial

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

First known attestation circa 1190, borrowed from Latin bēstiālis.

Adjective edit

bestial m (oblique and nominative feminine singular bestiale)

  1. bestial (of or relating to a beast)

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Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia (beast).

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /bes.t͡ʃiˈaw/ [bes.t͡ʃɪˈaʊ̯], (faster pronunciation) /besˈt͡ʃjaw/ [besˈt͡ʃjaʊ̯]
    • (Rio de Janeiro) IPA(key): /beʃ.t͡ʃiˈaw/ [beʃ.t͡ʃɪˈaʊ̯], (faster pronunciation) /beʃˈt͡ʃjaw/ [beʃˈt͡ʃjaʊ̯]
 

  • Rhymes: -al, -aw
  • Hyphenation: bes‧ti‧al

Adjective edit

bestial m or f (plural bestiais)

  1. bestial; brutish
  2. beastly
  3. (informal) cool

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Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French bestial, Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia (beast). By surface analysis, bestie +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

bestial m or n (feminine singular bestială, masculine plural bestiali, feminine and neuter plural bestiale)

  1. bestial, animal
  2. (informal) cool

Usage notes edit

As indicated by the informal meaning of "cool", this word does not have the same negative connotations as in English.

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia (beast).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /besˈtjal/ [besˈt̪jal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: bes‧tial

Adjective edit

bestial m or f (masculine and feminine plural bestiales)

  1. beastly
  2. massive, huge, giant
  3. tremendous, fantastic, awesome

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit