See also: Beet and bèèt

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
A pile of beets.

From Middle English bete, from Old English bete, from Latin beta. Most likely of Celtic etymology.

NounEdit

beet (plural beets)

  1. Beta vulgaris, a plant with a swollen root which is eaten or used to make sugar.
    The beet is a hardy species.
    There are beets growing over these.
  2. (US, Canada) A beetroot, a swollen root of such a plant.
Usage notesEdit
  • Unlike beetroot, beet is not usually uncountable when referring to the food: pickled beets (cf. pickled beetroot).
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English bētan.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

beet

  1. (transitive, obsolete, dialect) To improve; to mend.
  2. (transitive, obsolete, dialect) To kindle a fire.
  3. (transitive, obsolete, dialect) To rouse.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch beet, variant of biet, from Middle Dutch bete, from Latin bēta.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

beet (plural bete)

  1. beetroot

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /beːt/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: beet
  • Rhymes: -eːt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch bēte, from Old Dutch *biti, from Proto-Germanic *bitiz.

NounEdit

beet m (plural beten, diminutive beetje n)

  1. bite
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Negerhollands: bit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch bete, from Latin bēta.

NounEdit

beet f (plural beten, diminutive beetje n)

  1. Alternative form of biet.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

beet

  1. singular past indicative of bijten

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

beet

  1. nominative plural of bee

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

beet

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of beō

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French beste, from Latin bēstia.

NounEdit

beet f (plural beets)

  1. (Sark) animal