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See also: Bouillon

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1656, from French bouillon, from the verb bouillir (to boil), from Old French boillir, from Latin bullīre, present active infinitive of bulliō (I bubble, boil), from bulla (bubble).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbuː.jɒn/, /ˈbuː.jɒ̃/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbuː.jɑn/, /ˈbʊl.jɑn/, /ˈbʊl.jən/, /ˈbʊ.li.ən/, /ˈbɔɪ.jɑn/

NounEdit

bouillon (countable and uncountable, plural bouillons)

  1. A clear seasoned broth made by simmering usually light meat, such as beef or chicken.
  2. An excrescence on a horse's frush or frog.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bouillon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bouillon m (plural bouillons, diminutive bouillonnetje n)

  1. broth (water in which meat (or other food) has been boiled)
    Synonyms: vleesnat
  2. (dated) bullion, fringe of gold or silver wire
    Synonyms: cantille

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

bouillir +‎ -on

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bouillon m (plural bouillons)

  1. broth (water in which food (meat or vegetable etc) has been boiled)
  2. bubble rising from a boiling liquid
  3. gulp of liquid which escapes forcefully
  4. flesh rising on a fold
  5. risen fold of cloth
  6. unsold copies of a publication
  7. simple restaurant, which originally served only bouillon

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Further readingEdit


GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

bouillon m

  1. mud

Derived termsEdit