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EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English brekere, equivalent to break +‎ -er. Cognate with Dutch breker, German Brecher.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

breaker (plural breakers)

  1. Something that breaks.
  2. A machine for breaking rocks, or for breaking coal at the mines
  3. The building in which such a machine is placed.
  4. A person who specializes in breaking things.
  5. (chiefly in the plural) A wave breaking into foam against the shore, or against a sandbank, or a rock or reef near the surface, considered a useful warning to ships of an underwater hazard
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 53
      Now and then in the lagoon you hear the leaping of a fish [...]. And above all, ceaseless like time, is the dull roar of the breakers on the reef.
    • 1925, Ezra Pound, Canto I:
      And then went down to the ship,
      Set keel to breakers, forth on the godly sea
    • 1979, Stan Rogers, The Flowers of Bermuda:
      There came a cry: Oh, there be breakers dead ahead! / From the collier, Nightingale,
  6. (colloquial) A breakdancer.
  7. A user of CB radio.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Spanish barrica (barrel)

NounEdit

breaker (plural breakers)

  1. A small cask of liquid kept permanently in a ship's boat in case of shipwreck.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Then the conversation broke off, and there was little more talking, only a noise of men going backwards and forwards, and of putting down of kegs and the hollow gurgle of good liquor being poured from breakers into the casks.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

breaker m (plural breakers)

  1. circuit breaker
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

breaker

  1. (tennis) To break (win a game when receiving)
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit