breaker

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English breker, brekere, equivalent to break +‎ -er. Cognate with Dutch breker, German Brecher.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

breaker (plural breakers)

  1. Something that breaks.
  2. A machine for breaking rocks, or for breaking coal at the mines.
  3. The building in which such a machine is placed.
  4. A person who specializes in breaking things.
  5. (chiefly in the plural) A wave breaking into foam against the shore, or against a sandbank, or a rock or reef near the surface, considered a useful warning to ships of an underwater hazard
  6. (colloquial) A breakdancer.
  7. (US, dated) A user of CB radio.
    • 2015, Dave Wise, Stuart Wise, Like A Summer With A Thousand Julys
      Their radios had been blocked by a breaker calling himself Yankee Bucket Mouth.
  8. (primarily plural) Clipping of shipbreaker.
  9. (electrical engineering) Ellipsis of circuit breaker.
    breaker panel
  10. A horsebreaker.
    • 1831-1850, William Youatt, On the Structure and the Diseases of the Horse
      A hasty and passionate breaker will often make a really goodtempered young horse an inveterate gibber
    • 1886 October – 1887 January, H[enry] Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., published 1887, OCLC 1167497017:
      "My beauty endures even as I endure; still, if thou wilt, oh rash man, have thy will; but blame not me if passion mount thy reason, as the Egyptian breakers used to mount a colt, and guide it whither thou wilt not."
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

breaker

  1. (US, dated) Used to open a conversation or call for a response on CB radio.
    Breaker one nine

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Spanish barrica (barrel). Doublet of barrique.

NounEdit

breaker (plural breakers)

  1. A small cask of liquid kept permanently in a ship's boat in case of shipwreck.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, chapter 4, in Moonfleet, London; Toronto, Ont.: Jonathan Cape, published 1934:
      Then the conversation broke off, and there was little more talking, only a noise of men going backwards and forwards, and of putting down of kegs and the hollow gurgle of good liquor being poured from breakers into the casks.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁɛ.kœʁ/, /bʁe.kœʁ/

NounEdit

breaker m (plural breakers)

  1. circuit breaker
    Synonym: disjoncteur

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁɛ.ke/, /bʁe.ke/

VerbEdit

breaker

  1. (tennis) to break (win a game when receiving)
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

breaker m (uncountable)

  1. breaker; circuit breaker